How a nonprofit lender is helping to make immigration more affordable

MIAMI — For Vantanna Tarver — a 37-year-old Tampa resident — the cost of reuniting with her Jamaican boyfriend after he was taken into Immigration and Customs Enforcement custody was high.$4,000.That’s the bond amount Tarver had to come up with to get her boyfriend out of detention — a sum she couldn’t afford to pay with the income she earns from two cleaning jobs.“It was just very expensive,” she said.To put the money together, Tarver turned to Capital Good Fund, a nonprofit lender that helps members of working-class immigrant communities navigate the expenses and complexities of the U.S. imm...


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