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R. Kelly hit with updated federal charges in Chicago

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US authorities on Friday released revamped federal charges in Chicago against the R&B superstar R. Kelly, to include sex crime allegations that involve a new accuser.

The latest allegations against the disgraced 53-year-old artist — who is accused in multiple states of sex crimes against minors — goes into scant detail of the new accuser dubbed “Minor 6” but, like the original indictment, involves multiple child pornography counts.

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The superseding filing removes the reference to “Minor 2,” however, meaning there are still five accusers involved in the Chicago federal case.

Kelly — known for hits like “I Believe I Can Fly” — has a decades-long history of abuse allegations, especially of underage girls.

He will be arraigned under the superseding indictment in Chicago, possibly on March 5, when he already had a status hearing scheduled.

His Chicago trial was to begin April 27 but the court could postpone the proceedings.

“We are aware of the superseding indictment. We continue to fight for him and look forward to the day he is free,” Steve Greenberg, lawyer to the Grammy-award winning artist, tweeted.

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The Chicago federal charges allege Kelly filmed himself having sex with minors and that he paid potential witnesses in his 2008 trial — in which he was acquitted — to ensure their silence.

The new indictment seeks forfeiture of assets linked to Kelly’s production company, Bass Productions Ltd.

In December the artist born Robert Sylvester Kelly pleaded not guilty to bribery charges in New York that are believed to be linked to his marriage to the late singer Aaliyah when she was just 15 years old.

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That charge expanded on an earlier New York indictment that includes racketeering, accusing Kelly of systematically recruiting girls for sex while touring and coercing them into sexual activity.

Jury selection for the New York federal proceedings is currently scheduled for July 7.

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Kelly denies all accusations of sex abuse leveled against him.

In addition to the federal charges in New York and Chicago, the singer faces state charges in Illinois and Minnesota.

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2020 Election

‘Don’t listen to them’: Insurance industry front group to run ads attacking Medicare for All during Democratic debate

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"We are winning, so the industry is attacking Medicare for All to protect their profits and help the politicians defending those profits."

The Partnership for America's Health Care Future, an insurance industry front group formed in 2018 to combat Medicare for All, announced Wednesday that it will run television and social media ads against healthcare reform during the Democratic presidential debate in Las Vegas.

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Paul Krugman debunks Trump’s bogus claims about the ‘Obama economy’

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President Donald Trump has repeatedly insisted that his policies alone are responsible for the economic recovery in the United States, claiming that he inherited a broken economy from his Democratic predecessor, President Barack Obama. But Trump’s claims are wildly misleading, and economist/New York Times columnist Paul Krugman debunked some of them this week in a Twitter thread.

Krugman tweeted, “So, I see that Trump is bad-mouthing the Obama economy. Two points. First, there was absolutely no break in economic trends after the 2016 election.”

The 66-year-old Krugman posted a chart showing GDP (gross domestic product) from 2010 (when Obama was serving his first term) to 2020 (three years into Trump’s presidency). GDP, the chart shows, gradually improved during Obama’s eight-year presidency.

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Right-wing extremists using Facebook to recruit for ‘boogaloo’ attacks on liberals and cops: report

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A right-wing extremist movement is recruiting on social media to target liberals and law enforcement in a violent uprising called the "boogaloo."

The loosely organized movement is trolling for members on mainstream platforms such as Facebook, Instagram, Reddit and Twitter, in addition to 4chan and other fringe sites, to promote a second Civil War, reported NBC News.

“When you have people talking about and planning sedition and violence against minorities, police, and public officials, we need to take their words seriously,” said Paul Goldenberg, of the Homeland Security Advisory Council.

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