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‘Rich people have profited enough’: New poll shows two-thirds of Americans support wealth tax to combat inequality

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Support for a wealth tax to combat persistent inequality in the U.S. is growing, according to a new poll released Wednesday by TheHill/HarrisX which found that just over two-thirds of Americans favor a tax on the wealthiest households.

Sixty-seven percent of respondents—including majorities of Democrats and Independents—said there should be a wealth tax on billionaires, as Democratic presidential candidates Sens. Elizabeth Warren (D-Mass.) and Bernie Sanders (I-Vt.) have proposed.

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A clear majority of Democrats, 85%, backed the proposal, along with 66% of independent voters. Nearly half of Republican respondents—47%—said they would support a wealth tax in the poll, which was conducted between February 23 and 24 among more than 1,000 registered voters and had a margin of error of 3%.

The survey showed that, increasingly, “Americans are ready for a revolution,” tweeted Alejo Gonzalez, a labor organizer.

The survey was released a month after Reuters/Ipsos reported similar findings in another poll, which showed 64% of Americans supported a wealth tax.

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The Hill/HarrisX found similar support for Warren’s proposed wealth tax a year ago, soon after the senator released her plan to impose a 2% tax on wealth over $50 million and a 3% tax on assets over $1 billion.

Last September, Sanders detailed his proposal to impose a 1% tax on wealth between $32 and $50 million, with the rate progressively increasing on richer Americans.

The two senators have said revenue from their wealth taxes would go to funding universal childcare programs, Medicare for All, and tuition-free public college—all of which a majority of Americans have also been shown to support.

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2020 Election

Trump gambling his presidency on a voting group that may no longer exist

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President Donald Trump is betting that his law-and-order scare tactics will energize white suburban voters -- but that demographic may no longer exist as it once did.

The president remains popular in rural areas, and he won over suburban voters by 4 percent in 2016, and Trump and his Republican allies are betting he can turn out non-college educated whites who may be disgusted by police violence but don't support protests, reported Politico.

“There’s a lot of concern about the way the Minneapolis police acted,” said former Rep. Tom Davis, a seven-term Republican from the northern Virginia suburbs. “But whenever you start looting — and now the stuff’s spread out to Leesburg, it’s in Manassas … the politics takes a different turn.”

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2020 Election

‘One racist down. Hundreds in office to go’: Applause as Steve King is ousted in Iowa primary

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"Goodbye, Rep. Steve King. You are certainly not the only white supremacist in federal government, but you were among the most prominent," tweeted Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez.

While acknowledging that the important work of ridding Congress of racist lawmakers is far from finished, progressives celebrated the ouster of white supremacist Rep. Steve King in Iowa's Republican primary Tuesday as a significant victory and a step in the right direction.

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2020 Election

Amid pandemic, White House race becomes digital dogfight

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The 2020 US presidential race is becoming a digital-first campaign as the coronavirus pandemic cuts candidates off from traditional organizing and in-person events.

On the surface, President Donald Trump has the edge over Democrat Joe Biden because of the incumbent's extensive digital infrastructure and large social media following.

But Biden has been stepping up his digital presence and is getting a boost from a handful of outside organizations seeking to counter Trump's messaging on social platforms.

Both sides agree that digital will play a critical role in the 2020 White House race as social media have taken the place of rallies and door-to-door campaigning.

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