Quantcast
Connect with us

SC sheriff who allegedly punched woman is released on bond after new 15-count corruption indictment

Published

on

A South Carolina sheriff who was accused of punching a woman is facing 15 new charges from two new indictments that were unsealed on Tuesday.

South Carolina Attorney General Alan Wilson unveiled the indictments against Colleton County Sheriff R.A. Strickland in an announcement Tuesday morning.

The new charges accuse Strickland of corruption and misuse of his office.

ADVERTISEMENT

WCSC reported:

The new indictments allege Strickland made deputies and sheriff’s office staff spend time on duty working on improvements to his home, land and other properties as well as his political campaign. He also allegedly used county property including vehicles for his personal benefit.

Wilson also said the indictments allege Strickland used public funds of Colleton County to be spent on non-official lodging expenses during a law enforcement conference in Myrtle Beach, South Carolina.

Strickland also allegedly provided schedule IV controlled substances to a subordinate who did not have a valid prescription for the substance and has been accused of providing alcohol to a subordinate under the age of 21, attorney general spokesman Robert Kittle said.

He also has been accused of illegally distributed the prescription drugs Ambien and Adderall, according to Wilson.

Strickland was also charged with second-degree domestic violence last year after police accused him of punching a women who lived with him.

At a hearing on Tuesday afternoon, a judge set Strickland’s bond at $25,000. The judge said that the suspended sheriff will not be confined to house arrest or be forced to wear a GPS monitor while he is awaiting trial.

ADVERTISEMENT

ADVERTISEMENT

ADVERTISEMENT


Report typos and corrections to: [email protected].
READ COMMENTS - JOIN THE DISCUSSION
Continue Reading

Breaking Banner

Navy captain fired by Trump over coronavirus letter tests positive for COVID-19: report

Published

on

According to a report from the New York Times, the Navy captain relieved of his duties by the Trump administration over a letter drawing attention to dangerous health conditions on his aircraft carrier has tested positive for COVID-19.

The report states, "Capt. Brett E. Crozier, the Navy captain who was removed from command of the coronavirus-stricken aircraft carrier U.S.S. Theodore Roosevelt, has tested positive for Covid-19, according to two Naval Academy classmates of Crozier’s who are close to him and his family."

Continue Reading

Breaking Banner

Georgia GOP governor orders several beaches to reopen days after acknowledging he’s woefully uneducated on coronavirus spread

Published

on

The Atlanta Journal Constitution reported today that Kemp is reopening Tybee Island and other beaches along the Georgia coast.

Local officials in several of Georgia’s coastal communities reacted with fury on Saturday after Gov. Brian Kemp’s shelter-in-place order simultaneously reopened several of the state’s most popular beaches.

The stupidity and lack of regard of human life on display in Republican-run states is beyond criminal and inhumane. In fact, there are no words to describe this. Because the longer these so-called “leaders” make decisions that are in the best interests of, I don’t know who, the longer it will take to come out of this pandemic that is claiming so many thousands of lives.

Continue Reading
 

Breaking Banner

Health care insurers expected to jack up premiums as much as 40 percent to recoup coronavirus losses

Published

on

Private health insurers are expected to raise premiums by as much as 40% to recoup the costs of coronavirus testing and treatment, according to a new analysis from Covered California, the state's health care marketplace.

This article first appeared in Salon.

Though it remains unclear how much the coronavirus crisis will ultimately cost in health care expenditures, insurers will be submitting their 2021 rates to state regulators next month. Analyzing a wide range of models, Covered California expects that this year's care associated with the virus will cost between $34 billion and $251 billion, or between 2% of premiums and 21% of premiums. The analysis estimates that insurers would price the costs at double the rate into their 2021 premiums, projecting increases that range from as little as 4% to more than 40% for the 170 million workers and individuals who have private plans.

Continue Reading
 
 
You need honest news coverage. Help us deliver it. Join Raw Story Investigates for $1. Go ad-free.
close-image