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Trump’s Medicaid chief labels Medicaid ‘mediocre.’ Is it?

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The Trump administration’s top Medicaid official has been increasingly critical of the entitlement program she has overseen for three years.Seema Verma, administrator of the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services, has warned that the federal government and states need to better control spending and improve care to the 70 million people on Medicaid, the state-federal health insurance program for the low-income population. She supports changes to Medicaidthat would give states the option to receive capped annual federal funding for some enrollees instead of open-ended payouts based on enrollme…

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Jared Kushner slammed for buzzwording his way through coronavirus press conference

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At Thursday's coronavirus task force briefing, President Donald Trump's son-in-law Jared Kushner took the stand to discuss his own role in combating the outbreak.

Commenters on social media, however, did not care for what he had to say — and roundly criticized his appearance.

I didn't see it so let me just get this straight: Jared Kushner -- who has exactly about as many qualifications for dealing with a pandemic as he did for concocting Mideast peace -- was on hand to brief the American people about the #COVID19Pandemic but Dr. Fauci wasn't? Ok then. https://t.co/I94u3dYCAB

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Trump blasted as ‘commander of confusion’ in Washington Post review of his coronavirus failures

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President Donald Trump's response to the COVID-19 coronavirus was detailed in a new Washington Post story.

"In the three weeks since declaring the novel coronavirus outbreak a national emergency, President Trump has delivered a dizzying array of rhetorical contortions, sowed confusion and repeatedly sought to cast blame on others," the newspaper reported.

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How the pandemic pulled back the curtain on the flawed global economic system

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When the wealthiest country in the world is unable to produce basic medical gear to cope with a rampaging pandemic, it is dealing with a strategic vulnerability by depending on multinational supply chains to produce manufactured goods. Absent sufficient redundancies and physical reserves of resources, “just-in-time” lean supply systems can’t cope with sudden disruptions. The global pandemic of 2020 is a case in point.

This pandemic continues to unfold, but it will serve as the D-Day equivalent of a new predominating economic model for the world, and which in many ways was beginning to take shape before COVID-19. At its core, developed and mixed market economies will factor in the health risk and growing military cost of sustaining international supply chains against investing in high-tech production closer to their markets, and increasingly export their goods to the rest of the world.

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