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One state has figured out how to treat drug-addicted inmates

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CRANSTON, R.I. — On a gray, bone-chilling morning, 18 men in a medium-security prison walked into an empty lunchroom and sat at stainless steel-topped tables, placing both hands palms down, as if they were about to receive a manicure.Over the next few minutes, they received the anti-addiction medication buprenorphine under their tongues, administered by a nurse and double-checked by guards — with military precision. Then they were strip-searched before returning to their cells.This half-hour routine happens every day, part of a program developed at the Rhode Island Department of Corrections to…

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2020 Election

‘Truly grotesque’: On way out the door, Trump prioritizes bringing back executions by firing squad and electrocution

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Among the slew of potentially destructive policy changes the Trump administration is rushing to implement on its way out of power is a rule that would authorize the return of electrocutions and firing squads for federal executions, an effort critics slammed as a twisted priority amid deadly public health and economic crises.

ProPublica reported Wednesday that the rule, first published in the Federal Register by the U.S. Justice Department in August, "has raced through the process with little notice but unusual speed—and deadly consequences."

"This rule could reintroduce firing squads and electrocutions for federal executions, giving the government more options for administering capital punishment as drugs used in lethal injections become unavailable," ProPublica noted. "The Justice Department surfaced the proposal in August and accepted public comments for only 30 days, instead of the usual 60. The rule cleared White House review on Nov. 6, meaning it could be finalized any day."

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Trump and Bill Barr’s ‘bloodthirsty execution spree’ in his final months in office is unprecedented: op-ed

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In an op-ed for Slate this Tuesday, Austin Sarat says that the Trump administration's announcement that it would continue to carry out executions in the days and weeks leading up to the inauguration of President-elect Joe Biden is a "bloodthirsty decision" that defies "the norms and conventions for modern presidential transitions."

"The Death Penalty Information Center reports that the last time an outgoing administration did anything remotely similar was more than a century ago, in 1889," Sarat writes. "At that time Grover Cleveland, the first Democrat to be elected president after the Civil War and the only president ever to have served as an executioner (when he was the sheriff in Erie County, New York), permitted three executions to proceed in the period between his electoral defeat and Benjamin Harrison’s inauguration in March 1889."

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‘I’m in tears’: Americans grateful after watching Biden deliver more presidential speech than Trump

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President-elect Joe Biden addressed the nation about the Thanksgiving holiday, encouraging Americans to keep wearing their masks and stay away from people outside of your bubble because there is a light at the end of the COVID-19 tunnel of terror.

There are reports of vaccines possibly being available to healthcare and nursing home workers by the end of the year, which could help with over-crowding in hospitals.

Biden spoke about his family's large Thanksgivings and how hard it will be for him this holiday season without the crowd of Bidens. But he, like many Americans, are doing the right thing, he said, not just for his family but for every other family in the community.

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