‘Confessing to the crime’: Reporter’s claim about Trump being ‘reluctant’ to return records ignites legal experts
Donald Trump (MANDEL NGAN AFP/File)

Legal experts including Neal Katyal, Andrew Weissmann, and others are responding to a claim made by a right wing reporter that they say indicts rather than vindicates Donald Trump.

The claim was made by Paul Sperry, a former D.C. bureau chief for Investor's Business Daily, who has worked for the far right wing website WorldNetDaily. He is described as having a "long record of promoting anti-Muslim conspiracy theories" by Georgetown University's Bridge Initiative Team.

If his reporting is true, legal experts say it is a confession to unlawful actions regarding the 35 cartons of White House records that belong not to the former president, as he reportedly stated, but to the National Archives.

"BREAKING," Sperry's post on the right wing social media site Gettr begins. "Sources close to Trump say the former president was reluctant to furnish presidential records to the National Archives after he found out partisan Democrat political appointees there were releasing thousands of his White House documents to the January 6 Committee in spite of his lawyers' claims of executive privilege. They say the former president simply 'does not trust' the Obama and Biden political appointees running the National Archives to act in good faith and in bipartisan spirit."

That post was included as a screenshot and tweeted by attorney Ron Filipkowski.

Former FBI General Counsel Andrew Weissmann responds by saying: "Legally, this is a confession, not a defense, even if Trump thinks this plays to his base. The more Trump keeps talking, the more he keeps digging his legal grave."

Weissmann also served as an Assistant United States Attorney, chief of the criminal fraud section of the U.S. Department of Justice, and worked under Robert Mueller during the Trump investigation.

This "is Trump confessing to the crime," says former U.S. Acting Solicitor General Neal Katyal. "If this report is accurate, Trump is saying he took these doc[uments] for his personal gain. It's no defense to say 'the govt was going to be unfair.' These are the govt's docs, not his. He doesn't get to hide them & benefit."

The nonpartisan watchdog Citizens for Ethics (CREW) writes: "So Trump was intentionally breaking the law. That's really not the winner they think it is."

Attorney Owen Barcala offers up this sarcastic response: "How dare you say he negligently retained classified documents! He did so intentionally and with the specific purpose to interfere with a Congressional investigation!"

National security lawyer Mark S. Zaid: "These 'sources' close to Trump are undermining any possible factual or legal defenses he might assert. Please keep talking!"

Journalists are also weighing in.

Civil liberties and national security journalist Marcy Wheeler: "These 'sources close to Trump' LITERALLY just confessed to concealing official records to thwart an investigation, which is one of the crimes under investigation, 18 USC 1519."

Columbia Journalism School Professor Bill Grueskin: "Each story is more confession-y than the previous one."

New York Times opinion columnist Farhad Manjoo: "He's admitting to taking classified documents from the White House in order to keep them away from government officials? convenient, because that is ... specifically one of the crimes he's being investigated for."