Lawmakers tackle ‘period poverty’ with tax cuts, school supplies
Boxes of tampons are displayed in a pharmacy in New York. - Richard B. Levine/Newscom/Zuma Press/TNS

In her 11 years of practice, Dr. Anne Banfield, an OB-GYN at Davis Health System in West Virginia, has rarely, if ever, encountered a patient who voluntarily mentioned their struggles paying for menstrual hygiene products. People with low incomes can feel ashamed to talk about their challenges, she said. “Women don’t come to their physician and tell them that they can’t afford pads and tampons and menstrual cups and period underwear and all those sorts of things,” Banfield said. “For many people, poverty imparts a feeling of shame … when they can’t provide for their own needs.” Financial barri...