More legal woes loom over Alex Jones as he preps for second Sandy Hook defamation trial
Infowars host Alex Jones speaks during a video presented by the House Select Committee Investigating the Jan. 6 Attack on the U.S. Capitol. (Screenshot/YouTube.com)

As InfoWars host Alex Jones prepares for his second defamation trial in connection with his Sandy Hook conspiracy theories, a new analysis is breaking down what is really at stake.

According to Reuters' Jack Queen, Jones has a number of issues to be concerned about and the immediate issues center on the Connecticut trial starting this week.

"In the Connecticut trial beginning this week, 14 family members of Sandy Hook victims are seeking damages from Jones and Free Speech Systems for claiming they were 'crisis actors' who lied about their relatives’ deaths as part of a gun-grabbing conspiracy by the U.S. government," Queen wrote.

“He urged the audience to ‘investigate,’ knowing his audience would respond by cyberstalking, harassing, and threatening the plaintiffs,” the families said of the InfoWars host in their 2018 filing.

The trial comes after multiple delays due to Jones' failure to comply with the court system. In August, Free Speech Systems also filed for bankruptcy; an action many companies resort to in an effort to guard against lawsuits. However, the company did agree to move forward with the trial.

"The Sandy Hook parents in the Connecticut case have asked the judge overseeing Free Speech Systems’ bankruptcy to remove the company's existing management from the process and appoint a committee to represent them in the proceedings, claiming Jones’ company cannot be trusted to deal in good faith."

In addition to the current trial, Jones also has to face the aftermath of the Texas verdict where he was ordered to pay Sandy Hook parents Neil Heslin and Scarlett Lewis a total of $49.3 million on the grounds of allegations similar to those laid out in Connecticut.

The analysis also offered insight on what could come of Jones' show, InfoWars. "The Sandy Hook parents in the Connecticut case have asked the judge overseeing Free Speech Systems’ bankruptcy to remove the company's existing management from the process," he wrote, "and appoint a committee to represent them in the proceedings, claiming Jones’ company cannot be trusted to deal in good faith."

He also noted: "Jones said during an August broadcast that the bankruptcy will help him keep Infowars on the air and avoid paying any judgments for years as he appeals. Jones has also told listeners that Infowars is fighting for its life and urged them to purchase its supplements and his forthcoming book to buoy its finances through the litigation."