The EpiPen scandal runs deeper than most of us realize

It has been two years since Gilead Sciences Inc. rolled out its $1,000-a-pill hepatitis C drug Sovaldi, priced at $84,000 for a course of treatment and met with disbelief from patients, insurers and health care professionals. After an 18-month investigation the Senate Finance Committee concluded prices did not reflect Gilead’s development costs and that the drug maker cared about "revenue" not "affordability and accessibility.” The committee also found that Sovaldi and a related pill, Harvoni, cost taxpayers $5 billion in 2014.

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Early puberty in girls is becoming epidemic -- and it's getting worse

Padded bras for kindergarteners with growing breasts to make them more comfortable? Sixteen percent of U.S. girls experiencing breast development by the age of 7? Thirty percent by the age of 8? Clearly something is affecting the hormones of U.S. girls—a phenomenon also seen in other developed countries. Girls in poorer countries seem to be spared—until they move to developed countries.

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How an army of DC Pharma lobbyists have locked in one of the biggest ripoff schemes in America

After an 18-month investigation into the high cost of Gilead's hepatitis C drug Sovaldi—initially listed at $84,000 for a course of treatment or $1,000 per pill—the Senate Finance Committee said the prices did not reflect the cost of research and development and that Gilead cared about "revenue" not "affordability and accessibility." That sounds like an understatement. Sovaldi and the related pill Harvoni cost Medicare and Medicaid more than $5 billion in 2014, charged senators.

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'If you leave me, I will kill you': The horrifying truth about guns, abuse and murder in America

It happened on Black Friday 2014, at Nordstrom's on Chicago’s Magnificent Mile. Horrified shoppers watched as store employee Nadia Ezaldein was shot in the head at the accessories counter by her estranged ex-boyfriend, Marcus Dee, who then turned the gun on himself. Ezaldein was a 22-year-old University of Chicago student. Black Friday was her birthday. She died the next day.

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Here are 8 invented diseases Big Pharma is banking on

Since direct-to-consumer drug advertising debuted in 1997, pharma's credo has been When The Medication Is Ready, The Disease (and Patients) Will Appear. Who knew so many people suffered from restless legs? Now pharma is back to creating new diseases, patients, risks and "awareness campaigns." Check out these eight new diseases they've invented.

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Not going vegetarian, but cutting down on meat? There's a name for that

This latest campaign "encourages people to gradually eat less meat with respect to their own diet."

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Big Pharma in the bedroom: Are drugs that enhance sex a good thing?

Does anyone remember life before Viagra? In 1997, no one had heard of or used the term erectile dysfunction or ED--nor would most men have admitted to having the condition. Before the sanitized term debuted, ED was known by doctors as "impotence" and by the rest of us as "not getting it up." It was usually blamed on circumstances like too much to drink and men and their partners rarely talked about it.

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The 'Chronic' : 6 'diseases' Big Pharma Is trying to make you believe you suffer from

Have you ever noticed how Big Pharma in the United States has things exactly backward? Instead of developing new pills that people need like non-addictive painkillers and antibiotics for resistant infections, it develops new diseases.

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Big Pharma's guinea pigs: 8 drugs used by millions before being pulled for dangerous side-effects

Blockbuster drugs like Viagra, Lipitor, Prozac and Nexium have made Big Pharma one of the nation's top industries. Even before direct-to-consumer advertising on TV, there were blockbuster drugs like Ritalin, Valium, Tagamet and Premarin. To be a blockbuster a drug has to 1) be usable by almost everyone; 2) be used every day; 3) be used indefinitely; 4) solve an everyday health problem like heartburn or high cholesterol; 5) have a fun or memorable ad campaign; 6) get social buzz; and 7) be sold to a large number of people quickly.

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The most popular drug in America is an antipsychotic -- and no one really knows how it works

Does anyone remember Thorazine? It was an antipsychotic given to mentally ill people, often in institutions, that was so sedating, it gave rise to the term "Thorazine shuffle." Ads for Thorazine in medical journals, before drugs were advertised directly to patients, showed Aunt Hattie in a hospital gown, zoned out but causing no trouble to herself or anyone else. No wonder Thorazine and related drugs Haldol, Mellaril and Stelazine were called chemical straitjackets.

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