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I Thought We Elected Samuel L. Jackson President!

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Maureen Dowd writes a lot of short sentences.

She wants to show strength.

And so she is using few words, but powerfully so.

Mainly, she is just angry that the President wasn’t angry with anger because of a botched terrorist attack. This is because Presidents should not think, they should simply yell crazy shit so that us layfolk can comfortable about the fact that the President is leading.

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No Drama Obama is reticent about displays of emotion. The Spock in him needs to exert mental and emotional control. That is why he stubbornly insists on staying aloof and setting his own deliberate pace for responding — whether it’s in a debate or after a debacle. But it’s not O.K. to be cool about national security when Americans are scared.

Look. I live an hour from Detroit. I spend time in Detroit. People around here are not particularly scared. In fact, they’re more annoyed at the new ridiculous TSA guidelines than they are afraid that Barack Obama is going to let planes blow up out of a morbid and detached curiosity about the physics of concussive force in midair.

I’m not entirely sure what we’re supposed get from our President. There were screwups. Obama took an eminently reasonable amount of time to figure out what happened, and then talked to the nation about it. He didn’t attempt to turn a man wearing an explosive diaper into one of the Four Horsemen of the Apocalypse (War, Famine, Death and Pampers, apparently), he simply approached it like a rational human being.

It’s sickening how We the People are viewed by the commentariat – as scared little babies who expect our leaders to be pulled straight from the movies, able to insipid, buzzword-laden speeches that don’t communicate anything directly, but communicate to paid communicators that they’re communicating. And that, most of all, is what’s meaningful and effective for all of America. So get up there and start yelling, Obama. It’s the only way you’ll ever be good at anything.


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Trump aide told investigators Paul Manafort began spreading Ukraine conspiracy theories as soon as DNC server hack was revealed

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On Friday, a new batch of documents recording the interviews former special counsel Robert Mueller's prosecutors held with aides to President Donald Trump was released, as part of a Freedom of Information Act request by BuzzFeed News.

One of the revelations in the interviews with Rick Gates, who served as an aide to former Trump campaign chairman Paul Manafort, was that Manafort began pushing conspiracy theories about Ukraine at the same time that the Russian hack into the Democratic National Committee became publicly known.

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CNN’s Jim Acosta walks through all the times Trump has ‘thrown gasoline’ on racial tension

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On CNN Friday, following President Donald Trump's abrupt exit from a press conference following a racially charged tweet, chief White House correspondent Jim Acosta broke down President Donald Trump's history of stoking racial tensions during moments of crisis.

"He is trying to clean up this tweet that he posted last night," said Acosta. "First, just what the president said a few moments ago. He said the looters in Minneapolis should not be able to drown out the voice of so many peaceful protesters. That, obviously, is a very mild version of what he was trying to say or he claims he was trying to say last night when he tweeted, "when the looting starts, the shooting starts." That obviously is an expression steeped in all kinds of ugliness. The Miami Police chief back in 1967, when there was unrest in that city, used that expression. George Wallace, the segregationist, used words like that in 1968."

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Joe Biden takes on Trump’s rhetoric during racial justice crises: ‘The words of a president matter’

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Former Vice President Joe Biden talked about the importance of a president's words and accountability during times of crisis during a Friday appearance on MSNBC.

Biden was interviewed by Craig Melvin, who noted the protests tearing apart cities and asked where he would start if elected president.

"I start by talking about what we must be, making no excuses, talking about our obligation to be decent," Biden answered. "Our obligation to take responsibility, our obligation to stand up when we see injustice."

"Look, the words of a president matter -- no matter how good or bad that president is," he explained. "A president can, by their words alone no matter who they are, make it rise or fall, take us to war, bring us to peace. The words of a president matter."

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