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Axelrod suggests White House won’t support foreclosure moratorium

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President Barack Obama’s top adviser said Sunday that he wants Congress to address improper foreclosures but indicated that the White House doesn’t support calls for a national moratorium.

“I’m not sure about a national moratorium because there are, in fact, valid foreclosures that probably should go forward and where the documentation and paperwork is proper,” Axelrod said on CBS’ Face the Nation.

“We are working closely with these institutions to make sure that they expedite the process of going back and reconstructing these and throwing out those that don’t work,” he said.

CNN reported:

State attorneys general have stepped up pressure on banks after it was revealed that some bank employees had signed foreclosure affidavits without verifying that the documents were accurate, a process now known as “robo-signing.”

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Ohio’s attorney general has filed a lawsuit against Ally Financial and its subsidiary GMAC Mortgage for allegedly submitting fraudulent documents in hundreds of foreclosure cases across the state.

Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid, D-Nevada, called on major mortgage servicers to consider halting foreclosures in all 50 states in a statement released Friday.

“It is only fair to Nevada homeowners to suspend foreclosures until a thorough review of foreclosure processes is completed and homeowners can be assured that their documents are being analyzed properly,” Reid said.

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The White House announced Friday that the president would block a bill that would have made it more difficult for home owners to challenge foreclosures.

This video is from CBS’ Face the Nation, broadcast Oct. 10, 2010.


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Bill Barr may have killed probe of Trump’s payoff to Stormy Daniels: Florida prosecutor

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A Florida prosecutor called on Congress to examine whether Attorney General William Barr killed an investigation into an illegal payoff to porn actress Stormy Daniels.

Dave Aronberg, state attorney for Palm Beach County, said newly released court documents further implicated Trump and his former aide Hope Hicks in the scheme, which has already resulted in a prison term for the president's former attorney Michael Cohen -- who implicated his boss in the campaign finance law violation.

"You and I don't have the benefit of the internal DOJ policy that forbids indicting a sitting president, and I think that is relevant here," Aronberg told MSNBC's "Morning Joe." "There are a lot of things going on here. But I think that the public needs to know -- there needs to be public hearings about this. Especially I want to know what Bill Barr's role is."

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Machine-meshed super-humans remain stuff of fantasy

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A bold vision by tech entrepreneur Elon Musk to mesh human brains with artificial intelligence remains more science fiction than reality.

Even as Musk claimed his Neuralink startup had enabled a monkey to control a computer with its brain, experts were quick to dampen expectations for a futuristic scenario from "The Matrix" films, based on people with cybernetic implants.

Musk this week revealed his Neuralink startup is making progress on its brain-computer interface effort, and said the company hopes to begin testing on people next year.

Musk, founder of the automaker Tesla and the private space firm SpaceX, has long contended that a neural lace meshing minds with machines is vital if humans are to avoid being outpaced by artificial intelligence.

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Ilhan Omar, US congresswoman in eye of political storm

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To her supporters, Ilhan Omar embodies the American dream, but to Donald Trump and his loyalists the refugee-turned-congresswoman has made clear with a string of controversial comments that she is a dangerous radical.

The Somali-born Muslim lawmaker came to the United States as a child and eventually won a seat in Congress.

On Thursday the first-term Democratic lawmaker became the focus of a raging debate on race and American values after Trump's supporters began chanting "Send her back!" at a campaign rally with the president.

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