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Family group demands Florida’s governor-elect stop selling porn

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A conservative Christian group wants Florida’s Republican governor-elect to stop selling “pornography” to Latinos.

The Christian Family Coalition (CFC) is calling for Rick Scott to divest in the website QuePasa which has a partnership with Playboy Mexico. Scott reportedly owns shares of QuePasa worth about $6-8 million — nearly 15 percent of the company.

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“We cannot have a governor in the state of Florida that invests in companies that sell pornography,” Christian Family Coalition’s Rev. Mark D. Boykin told The Miami Herald. “We are asking that before he takes the oath of office, Gov.-elect Scott gets rid of his stocks from QuePasa Corporation. The governor of the state of Florida should not be benefiting or have an interest in pornography. It goes against our family values.”

QuePasa partners with Playboy Mexico to promote a monthly search for “Cyber Chicas.” Politifact verified the company’s connection to Playboy Mexico.

As McCollum suggested, Quepasa and Playboy began partnering in 2009 to find and identify “Cyber Chicas” for the magazine’s Mexico edition. Quepasa created an online community that features models wanting to be included in Playboy. Users of the website can go to the Playboy community to vote for and rank the women. Three finalists are forwarded each month to Playboy, which selects a winner. A 24-year-old Brazilian, Fernanda Schonardie, was selected as the first “Cyber Chica” and was featured in a full-page layout in the March 2009 edition of Playboy México. The partnership has continued since (We’ll skip the links).

CFC also pointed out that QuePasa includes social communities for gays and lesbians.

“Scott’s spokesman, Brian Burgess, called the coalition ultra-conservative and hypocritical for criticizing Scott when the coalition members have profiles on Facebook, which accepts advertising from Playboy and Penthouse,” WESH reported.

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“Mr. Scott will move his money into a blind trust and will remove himself from the decision-making when it comes to his investments,” Burgess said.

During the general election, Scott cited his ownership of QuePasa shares to highlight his connection to the Latino community. “I’ve invested in another Hispanic company, again creates Hispanic jobs, jobs for Hispanics, called QuePasa. I’ve been very fortunate in my relationships in the Miami market and meeting Hispanics and building businesses with them,” Scott said during a debate.

This video is from WESH, broadcast Nov. 18, 2010.

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