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New blood test could detect Alzheimer’s

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WASHINGTON — US scientists may have found a new way to use a blood test to search for clues of Alzheimer’s disease, a discovery that if proven could extend to other ailments, said a study released Thursday.

“If this works in Alzheimer’s disease, it suggests it is a pretty general platform that may work for a lot of different diseases,” said Thomas Kodadek of The Scripps Research Institute, whose work was published in the journal Cell.

“Now we need to put it in the hands of disease experts to tackle diseases where early diagnosis is key.”

There is no cure for Alzheimer’s, the most common form of dementia which afflicts five million people in the United States, so the wider public might not see much use in a test for it.

However pharmaceutical companies could use the information to better locate patients for clinical trials.

Kodadek tried a new way to identify signals of disease in the blood, using molecules called peptoids to detect antibodies in the bloodstream of animals and patients with specific diseases.

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After isolating more immunoglobulin, a major type of antibody, in mice with a condition similar to multiple sclerosis than he did in healthy mice, he moved on to humans and tested six patients with Alzheimer’s, six with Parkinson’s and six healthy people.

The tests were able to find three peptoids that captured levels of immunoglobulin in the Alzheimer’s patients that was three times higher than the Parkinson’s or the control group.

“Dr Kodadek has conceived of a new approach for identifying antibody biomarkers of human disease that bypasses the conventional, but difficult, step of identifying the natural antigens or antigen mimics,” said James Anderson of the National Institutes of Health which helped fund the study.

“The results in the paper suggest great potential for using this approach to rapidly develop diagnostic biomarkers for a variety of significant human diseases.”

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The next step is to try the method on other diseases, such as pancreatic cancer which is swift and deadly.

“It’s possible that antibody-based tests might identify such cancers years before they could be detected otherwise,” said the study.

Then drug makers would have precious knowledge for developing vaccines against cancer.

“That’s the dream scenario,” said Kodadek.

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Longtime Ohio news anchor retires after dispute with Sinclair Broadcasting over forced pro-Trump commentaries

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Rob Braun, a fixture on local Cincinnati television for over 35 years, is retiring after stating it was "time to move on" because "I don't fit well with the Sinclair News model," reports WVXU.

The reports states that Braun -- the dean of Cincinnati's WKRC news broadcasting -- made the comments on his Facebook page and assured loyal fans that he was not fired by the conservative news organization.

In a Facebook post, he wrote: "I want you to know that I am not retiring. Ch 12 is NOT forcing me out. In fact, they offered me a generous contract. I am choosing to leave. There is no 'real story but .... Sometimes in life, you just know, it's time to move on. I don't feel I fit well with the Sinclair News model."

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Downed drone was some 34 km (21 miles) from Iran coast: US general

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A US spy drone was some 34 kilometers (21 miles) from the nearest point in Iran when it was shot down over the Strait of Hormuz by an Iranian surface-to-air missile Thursday, a US general said.

"This dangerous and escalatory attack was irresponsible and occurred in the vicinity of established air corridors between Dubai, UAE, and Oman, possibly endangering innocent civilians," said Lieutenant General Joseph Guastella, who commands US air forces in the region.

The Pentagon released a graphic pinpointing the position of the drone on a map of the Strait of Hormuz, the strategic passage through which much of the world's oil passes.

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Alex Jones attacks Sandy Hook families’ lawyer as a ‘little white Jewboy’ in latest unhinged outburst

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Alex Jones is dealing with ongoing legal battles with families of victims and survivors of the Sandy Hook Elementary School shooting.

Jones is being accused of sending child pornography to the families and leading an ongoing attack on the families using his InfoWars network. However, his legal defense seems to hinge on attacking the plaintiffs' attorney, AboveTheLaw reported Thursday.

It was the child pornography that prompted Jones to lose his mind over attorney Chris Mattei. During the discovery phase of the trial, Mattei found the images and contacted the FBI, which he is required to do by law. But it sent Jones into an outright ragegasm in a video that was shown in court.

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