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Bomb at MLK parade may have contained poison, police say

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A bomb planted along the route of a Martin Luther King Day parade in Spokane, Washington, appeared to have been an attempt at a sophisticated attack, according to statements made by law enforcement officials.

Spokane police said this week that the bomb — which was found before the parade began on January 17 and defused — may have contained a chemical commonly found in rat poison, potentially in an effort to inflict even greater damage on its victims.

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According to the Spokesman-Review, “rat poison has been added to bombs in the Middle East for the stated purpose of acting as an anti-coagulant – which inhibits the ability of bleeding wounds to clot.”

There has been controversy over whether reports of rat poison in insurgent bombs are accurate. Nonetheless, it may be possible that the perpetrator was someone who was familiar with the tactics of Middle Eastern insurgencies.

“It’s not like some of the other types of devices I have seen in Spokane or in my career,” Spokane Police Chief Anne Kirkpatrick told the press. “This is one of sophistication.”

Officials also told the newspaper that the backpack in which the bomb was planted was placed such that its blast would target marchers in the parade.

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FBI officials said earlier their believed the bomb to be an act of “domestic terrorism” and suggested the failed attack may have been racially motivated.

The Statesman Examiner notes that eastern Washington state, where Spokane is located, “has been the location of multiple incidents of anti-government and white supremacist activity for over two decades.”

Federal investigators are also investigating an explosive device that was found last March near the U.S. Courthouse in Spokane. An arrest has not been made in that case.

Another bomb packed with shrapnel exploded outside Spokane City Hall in the spring of 1996. Federal prosecutors indicted white supremacists Chevie Kehoe of Stevens County and Danny Lee of Oklahoma for that bombing. Both were ultimately convicted of a 1996 triple homicide in Arkansas.

FBI Special Agent Frank Harrill said investigators aren’t ready to name any suspects in the case. The bureau has offered a $20,000 reward for information leading to a suspect.


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Millions around the world joined #ClimateStrike — demanding bold climate action

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Masses of children skipped school Friday to join a global strike against climate change that teen activist Greta Thunberg said was "only the beginning" in the fight against environmental disaster.

Some four million people filled city streets around the world, organizers said, in what was billed as the biggest ever protest against the threat posed to the planet by rising temperatures.

Youngsters and adults alike chanted slogans and waved placards in demonstrations that started in Asia and the Pacific, spread across Africa, Europe and Latin America, before culminating in the United States where Thunberg rallied.

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Trump announces new sanctions on Iran — and deploys US troops to the Middle East

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The United States announced Friday that it was sending military reinforcements to the Gulf region following attacks on Saudi oil facilities that it attributes to Iran, just hours after President Donald Trump ordered new sanctions on Tehran.

Trump said the sanctions were the toughest-ever against another country, but indicated he did not plan a military strike, calling restraint a sign of strength.

The Treasury Department renewed action against Iran's central bank after US officials said Tehran carried out weekend attacks on rival Saudi Arabia's oil infrastructure, which triggered a spike in global crude prices.

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‘Do a lot of stupid sh*t as quickly as possible’: Ambassador Power breaks down ’The Trump Doctrine’

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The former ambassador to the United Nations explained "The Trump Doctrine" during a Friday evening interview with comedian Bill Maher on HBO's "Real Time."

Samantha Power, the author of the new book, The Education of an Idealist, was asked by Maher about the foreign policy mantra of the Obama administration.

"Obama's foreign policy doctrine was famously summarized as 'don't do stupid sh*t," Maher noted. "Trump's, of course, is 'Do stupid sh*t.'"

"Do stupid sh*t as quickly as possible," Power clarified.

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