Quantcast
Connect with us

Early baldness doubles risk of prostate cancer: study

Published

on

PARIS – Men who start to lose their hair by age 20 — a syndrome known as pattern baldness — are twice as likely to develop prostate cancer later in life, according to a new study.

The findings, published this week in the Annals of Oncology, could help identify men who should be screened early and more often for disease, the researchers said.

Prostate cancer is the commonest non-skin cancer among men worldwide and, after lung tumours, is the second biggest cause of death from cancer among men in the United States and Europe. Most cases occur among men aged in their sixties.

ADVERTISEMENT

Earlier research has shown that sex hormones called androgens play a key role in the development of both pattern baldness and cancer of the prostate, a walnut-sized gland near the bladder crucial to the male reproductive system.

But the link between the two remained obscure, with at least one study suggesting that premature baldness actually pointed to a reduced risk of cancer.

To probe further, a team of scientists led by Philippe Giraud of Georges Pompidou European Hospital in Paris asked 669 men — 338 of whom had a history of prostate cancer — how bald they were at ages 20, 30 and 40, using standardised images for reference.

Men who did not start to lose their hair until age 30 or 40 showed no increased risk compared to the control group of developing the dreaded disease.

But for those who had early-onset balding — a condition known to doctors as androgenic alopecia — at age 20, the risk doubled.

ADVERTISEMENT

Giraud said balding men should not panic. “The fact that a (young) man is losing his hair does not mean that he will have cancer,” he said by telephone.

He also cautioned that the results would need to be verified in follow up studies.

But the findings suggest that premature balding could become a useful marker to help doctors screen for the disease, he said.

ADVERTISEMENT

“Current prostate screening protocols are very controversial because some worry that systematic screening at 50 years old — without taking other criteria into account — will lead to over-treatment,” he said.

Many countries have routine screening programmes for men in their middle age.

ADVERTISEMENT

One of the problems, however, is that the so-called PSA antigen test, now 20 years old, cannot distinguish between low-risk tumours and aggressive lesions that are often fatal.

Antigen levels can also fluctuate according to the individual and may be skewed by prostate inflammation.

One out of two men lose their hair, but of the 50 percent of men who go partially or totally bald, only 10 to 15 percent suffer from androgenic alopecia, Giraud said.

ADVERTISEMENT

Another study published last year showed that finger patterns could also help identify which men should undergo regular screening.

Men whose index fingers are longer than their ring, or fourth, fingers run a significantly lower risk of prostate cancer, the study found.


Report typos and corrections to: [email protected].
READ COMMENTS - JOIN THE DISCUSSION
Continue Reading

Facebook

Marie-Antoinette and lover’s censored letters deciphered

Published

on

Love letters between the ill-fated French queen Marie-Antoinette and her lover, which contain key passages rendered illegible by censor marks, have been deciphered using new techniques, the French National Archives said on Wednesday.

The revealed passages are further confirmation of the steamy relationship between Marie-Antoinette and Count de Fersen, who were writing to each other two years after the 1789 French revolution.

At the time, the queen and King Louis XVI were living under surveillance in the Parisian Tuileries palace and had just failed to escape their house arrest.

Continue Reading

Facebook

Genetically modified mosquitoes could be released in Florida and Texas beginning this summer – silver bullet or jumping the gun?

Published

on

This summer, for the first time, genetically modified mosquitoes could be released in the U.S.

On May 1, 2020, the company Oxitec received an experimental use permit from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency to release millions of GM mosquitoes (labeled by Oxitec as OX5034) every week over the next two years in Florida and Texas. Females of this mosquito species, Aedes aegypti, transmit dengue, chikungunya, yellow fever and Zika viruses. When these lab-bred GM males are released and mate with wild females, their female offspring die. Continual, large-scale releases of these OX5034 GM males should eventually cause the temporary collapse of a wild population.

Continue Reading
 

Facebook

Physicists hunt for room-temperature superconductors that could revolutionize the world’s energy system

Published

on

Waste heat is all around you. On a small scale, if your phone or laptop feels warm, that’s because some of the energy powering the device is being transformed into unwanted heat.

On a larger scale, electric grids, such as high power lines, lose over 5% of their energy in the process of transmission. In an electric power industry that generated more than US$400 billion in 2018, that’s a tremendous amount of wasted money.

Continue Reading
 
 
You need honest news coverage. Help us deliver it. Join Raw Story Investigates for $1. Go ad-free.
close-image