Quantcast
Connect with us

US fires 118 drone bombs at Pakistan, killing just two most-wanted terrorists

Published

on

WASHINGTON – Over one-hundred drone strikes in Pakistan last year ended up killing a total of 2 terrorists on the US most-wanted list, according to independent estimates.

In 2010, the CIA launched a total of 118 drone attacks in Pakistan, each costing more than $1 million, The Washington Post reported. It was a year in which the US dramatically expanded the scope and frequency of the strikes, which began under the Bush administration.

ADVERTISEMENT

But just two of the militants killed were on the most-wanted list, according to the National Counterterrorism Center, which keeps track of terrorist leaders. They are Sheik Saeed al-Masri, a top Al-Qaeda operative, and Ahmed Mohammed Hamed Ali, who helped carry out the US embassy bombings of 1998.

An additional thirteen were considered “high-value targets,” while the vast majority of the 581 estimated militants killed were low-level operatives.

A senior Pakistani official said that most of those killed were “mere foot soldiers” who had no leadership role or influence over the extremist groups, reflecting a broadening of the targets that were once limited to senior leaders of Al-Qaeda and similar factions.

US military officials say the program has helped disrupt Al-Qaeda’s operational capacity since the attacks of September 11, 2001.

Yet the numbers raise important questions about the efficacy of the unmanned predator drone strikes — in addition to longstanding questions about their morality — as the classified program plays a larger role in US counter-terrorism strategy.

ADVERTISEMENT

“We would be remiss if we didn’t go after people who have American blood on their hands,” a US official told the Post. “To use a military analogy, if you’re only going after the generals, you’re likely to be run over by tanks.”

To the CIA’s credit, the collateral damage from the drone bombs has apparently fallen in recent years. The New America Foundation estimates that civilian casualties dropped to 6 percent in 2010, from 25 percent in 2004.

The drone attacks have contributed to souring perceptions of the US in Pakistan, where favorable ratings are notably low.

ADVERTISEMENT

Two out of three Pakistani journalists view the US strikes as acts of terrorism, according to a recent survey.


Report typos and corrections to: [email protected].
READ COMMENTS - JOIN THE DISCUSSION
Continue Reading

Breaking Banner

Matt Gaetz forgot which network he was on: Surprised CNN anchor said ‘I’ve never been called Sean Hannity’

Published

on

Rep. Matt Gaetz seemed to confuse cable news networks during a Thursday appearance

Gaetz was interviewed by CNN's Chris Cuomo, who aggressively challenged Gaetz on the facts as the Florida Republican attempted to defend President Donald Trump.

Despite the fact Cuomo's interview was nothing like the puff segments Gaetz is used to on Fox, the congressman seemed confused by the end.

"Congressman, you are always welcome, wherever I am, at nine or eleven, whenever," Cuomo said.

"Thanks Sean," Gaetz replied.

"Did you just call me Sean?" Cuomo asked. "Did you just call me Sean?"

Continue Reading

Breaking Banner

California lawmaker who chaired Republican Assembly caucus leaving GOP — to become an independent: report

Published

on

On Thursday, the Sacramento Bee reported that California Assemblyman Chad Mayes, the former Assembly Minority Leader, is leaving the Republican Party and registering as No Party Preference.

"Instead of focusing on solutions for the big problems that we've got, we focused on winning elections," said Mayes in his announcement. "For me, I'm at the point in my life where I'm done with gamesmanship."

Mayes, a controversial figure who was implicated in an affair with a fellow public official, represents Yucca Valley. He is the second Republican Assemblyman this year to leave the party, after Brian Maienschein of San Diego, who Maienschein of San Diego.

Continue Reading
 

Breaking Banner

‘Quantum physics generator’ incident in Ohio results in evacuation — hazmat found no radiation

Published

on

Authorities in Columbus, Ohio evacuated dozens of homes after a man called 911 to report being burned by a

"Firefighters say nothing threatening was found in a northwest Columbus garage," WCMH-TV reported. "According to firefighters, a man called and reported that he received ‘RF burns’ while building some sort of ‘quantum physics generator’ in a garage. The man used words like ‘particle accelerator,’ ‘alpha rays,’ and ‘radiation’ while describing how he was burned."

Continue Reading