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Hackers hit ‘Neverwinter Nights’ game forums

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SAN FRANCISCO — US videogame giant Electronic Arts (EA) on Friday revealed that hackers had looted user data in “a highly sophisticated” attack.

A computer network hosting BioWare Edmonton’s “Neverwinter Nights” game forums was hit by hackers who made off with users’ names, passwords, email addresses, birth dates and other personal information, EA said at its website.

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“The server system associated with the ‘Neverwinter Nights’ forums was the target of a highly sophisticated and unlawful cyber attack,” EA said.

“We have moved swiftly to implement additional security controls to prevent this type of breach from happening again to secure your data and are conducting further evaluations now,” the message continued.

No credit card information was taken in the hack, according to the Northern California-based firm.

EA was the latest in an unrelenting string of cyber attacks with targets ranging from Arizona police and the Central Intelligence Agency to videogame makers and the US Public Broadcasting Service.

Sega on Sunday released word that hackers had stolen the personal data of some 1.29 million customers of the Japanese game maker in a theft via a website of its European unit.

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The Sega Pass website, operated by London-based Sega Europe, did not contain credit card information, the Japanese firm said.

But names, dates of birth, email addresses and encrypted passwords were stolen by intruders to the site, Sega said in a Japanese-language statement.

A series of hacker attacks on Japanese electronics and entertainment giant Sony in April forced it suspend online services for weeks.

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Sony suffered one of the biggest data breaches since the advent of the Internet, with personal data from 100 million accounts compromised.


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DOJ dropping investigation into GOP senator’s stock trades ignites outrage: ‘Quid pro quo, baby’

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On Tuesday, the Justice Department ended its investigation into three senators accused of insider trading, including Sen. Kelly Loeffler (R-GA), all of whom sold stocks around the time they were receiving classified hearings on the coronavirus pandemic. Their investigation against Sen. Richard Burr (R-NC), however, continues.

There are some differences between the Burr case and the others, including that Burr admits to having ordered the trades himself whereas Loeffler says a financial adviser made the trades without her knowledge.

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SpaceX readies for blast-off with NASA astronauts aboard

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Gray skies loomed over Florida's Atlantic coast Tuesday, just one day before two astronauts were set to blast off aboard a SpaceX capsule on the most dangerous and prestigious mission NASA has ever entrusted to a private company.

There was a 60 percent chance for favorable weather for Wednesday's flight, according to Tuesday's latest Cape Canaveral forecast.

US astronauts Bob Behnken and Doug Hurley have been in strict quarantine for two weeks ahead of their trip on the brand-new Crew Dragon capsule, which will be propelled by a Falcon 9 rocket.

Both the capsule and the rocket were manufactured by SpaceX, the start-up founded in 2002 by the then-thirty-something Elon Musk, a brilliant and brash Mars-obsessive who made his fortune with PayPal and also created the famous Tesla electric cars.

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DOJ closes insider trading investigations against three senators — but is still investigating Richard Burr: report

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On Tuesday, The Wall Street Journal reported that Justice Department officials are closing insider trading investigations into three senators — Sens. Dianne Feinstein (D-CA), Kelly Loeffler (R-GA), and Jim Inhofe (R-OK).

However, a fourth probe, into insider trading allegations against Sen. Richard Burr (R-NC), is reportedly ongoing.

"The Federal Bureau of Investigation began the investigations two months ago, as reports emerged that several members of Congress, their spouses or their investment advisers sold hundreds of thousands of dollars in stock after lawmakers attended closed-door briefings about the threat posed by the new coronavirus," reported Aruna Viswanatha. "Some of those trades spared lawmakers as much as hundreds of thousands of dollars in losses as stocks sank by mid-March."

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