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Nissan may delay electric Leaf production in U.S.

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DETROIT, Michigan (AFP) – Nissan may be forced to delay US production of its electric Leaf and is falling short of this year’s goals as a result of the devastating Japanese earthquake, a key executive said Monday.

“After March 11, all the resources of the company were devoted to helping with the recovery” in Japan, said Hideaki Watanabe, Nissan vice president for zero-emission vehicles.

“It put us in a very difficult situation,” Watanabe told a group of reporters over lunch at the Nissan Research and Development Center in suburban Detroit.

“We’re trying to shorten the delay but I wouldn’t want to make any predictions.”

Nissan has delivered 7,550 electric-powered Leafs to customers in Japan, the United States, Hong Kong and Europe so far this year.

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Filling order has been slower than expected because Nissan won’t be able to meet its production 2011 production target of 50,000 Leafs.

“In 2012, we hope to be in a more normal situation,” Watanabe said.

The electric vehicles proved to be extremely handy during the fuel shortages which followed the earthquake and tsunami, particularly because most owners recharged their vehicles overnight when more electricity was available.

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As a result, Nissan is exploring technology that could turn the Leaf and its lithium-ion battery into an emergency generator, Watanabe said.

The technology would allow the Leaf to discharge electricity as well as drawing it in.

Despite the shortages, Nissan plans to soon begin distributing the Leaf beyond the original seven US states targeted in the initial launch of the vehicle, which included California, Oregon, Washington, Arizona, Texas and Tennessee.

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Leafs will be in dealers in a half dozen states along the US east coast this fall and in all 50 states by the end of 2012.

About 2,000 Leafs have been delivered to customers in the United States since they went on sale in December and the automaker has the names of 22,000 more potential numbers.

“Even before the earthquake, we decided on a very conservative ramp up. We wanted to double check everything. Quality is our top priority,” Watanbe said. Nissan’s Tennessee electric battery plant was forecast to come online in late 2012 with the capacity to produce 200,000 batteries annually.

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Nissan had planned to begin building as many as 150,000 Leafs a year in Tennessee by the end of 2012.


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Machine-meshed super-humans remain stuff of fantasy

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A bold vision by tech entrepreneur Elon Musk to mesh human brains with artificial intelligence remains more science fiction than reality.

Even as Musk claimed his Neuralink startup had enabled a monkey to control a computer with its brain, experts were quick to dampen expectations for a futuristic scenario from "The Matrix" films, based on people with cybernetic implants.

Musk this week revealed his Neuralink startup is making progress on its brain-computer interface effort, and said the company hopes to begin testing on people next year.

Musk, founder of the automaker Tesla and the private space firm SpaceX, has long contended that a neural lace meshing minds with machines is vital if humans are to avoid being outpaced by artificial intelligence.

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France defiant on plans to impose ‘Gafa’ tax on tech giants

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France on Wednesday said it would push ahead with its law to tax tech giants that has sparked a row with the United States, saying that an international accord was the only way to solve the dispute.

French Finance Minister Bruno Le Maire met US Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin on the sidelines of the meeting of finance ministers from the world's seven most developed economies in Chantilly outside Paris.

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EU launches in-depth probe on Amazon over data use

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The EU's powerful antitrust authority launched an in-depth investigation into Amazon on Wednesday, amid suspicions the US-based online behemoth misuses merchant data hosted on its website.

The formal investigation opens a new chapter in the European Union's campaign to address the dominance of US tech firms with Google, Facebook and Apple also regular targets of regulators in Brussels.

With its probe, the EU competition watchdog is seeking to expand its oversight powers to data, the most prized asset for Silicon Valley giants that now dominate web-use worldwide.

"I have... decided to take a very close look at Amazon's business practices and its dual role as marketplace and retailer (and) to assess its compliance with EU competition rules," the EU's anti-trust commissioner Margrethe Vestager said in a statement.

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