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Supreme Court rejects new execution bid for Mumia Abu-Jamal

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The US Supreme Court Tuesday rejected a prosecution request to reinstate the death penalty for Mumia Abu-Jamal, a former Black Panther convicted of murder whose case has rallied death penalty opponents.

The top US court upheld an appellate decision in April which declared the death sentence for Abu-Jamal unconstitutional.

The justices in 2010 had sent the case back to the lower courts for further review.

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Prosecutors had asked the Supreme Court to overturn the appellate decision, which would have allowed for the death penalty to be reinstated for Abu-Jamal, who has been on death row for nearly 30 years and who has claimed he is innocent in the murder of a white police officer.

The Pennsylvania appeals court set aside Abu-Jamal’s death sentence over procedural irregularities during his trial, finding that the jury mistakenly had been led to believe that it could not consider mitigating factors against a death sentence.

Abu-Jamal and his supporters claim that the guilty verdict against him was predetermined because he was an African-American and a member of the radical leftist Black Panthers movement.

A writer and president of the Philadelphia Association of Black Journalists at the time of his arrest, he has continued to write from death row.

The NAACP Legal Defense & Educational Fund said the decision marks the fourth time that the federal courts have found that Abu-Jamal’s sentencing jury was misled about the constitutionally mandated process for considering evidence supporting a life sentence.

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“At long last, the profoundly troubling prospect of Mr. Abu-Jamal facing an execution that was produced by an unfair and unreliable penalty phase has been eliminated,” said John Payton of the NAACP.

“Like all Americans, Mr. Abu-Jamal was entitled to a proper proceeding that takes into account the many substantial reasons why death was an inappropriate sentence.”


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Trump continues a conspiracy that never ended as he covers up the cover up of a crime

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It’s hard to know where to begin discussing the president’s commutation of Roger Stone’s sentence. So let’s start with what it means. It’s not a pardon. Donald Trump’s goombah is still a felon convicted of witness tampering and lying to the US Congress. He plans to appeal the guilty verdict. “Commutation” merely means he won’t go to jail.

This article was originally published at The Editorial Board

The move was widely expected in Washington. Only the timing was in doubt. The president had hoped to wait until after the election, according to Bloomberg News, but Stone appears to have forced his hand. He feared prison would expose him to the new coronavirus, which can be fatal to people his age (67). Stone told a journalist Thursday that he believed the president would commute his sentence, because he stayed quiet while under pressure to cooperate. That statement, given the day before his 40-month sentence was to begin, was widely interpreted to mean: do it now or I start singing.

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COVID patients can be overwhelmed with inflammation. Doctors are learning to calm that ‘storm’

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In the millions of tiny air sacs tasked with absorbing oxygen in Brett Breslow’s lungs, the scene was chaos.Some of the sacs were swollen with fluid that had leaked from surrounding blood vessels. Others had simply collapsed. The grim result: the Cherry Hill man was starved of oxygen, leading doctors at Cooper University Hospital to put him on a ventilator for 19 days.Breslow was suffering from a massive bout of inflammation — a catch-all description for the damage in many of the sickest patients with COVID-19. In addition to the assault on his lungs, the disease was harming his liver and kidn... (more…)

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Gun drawn on Black driver pulled over by police in Minneapolis suburb — but they had the wrong guy

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MINNEAPOLIS — A Black man said thoughts of George Floyd went through his head as he sat in the back of a police squad car after officers pulled him over — at least one of them with gun drawn — in a Minneapolis suburb until they realized they had the wrong guy. “I could have been dead today,” Darrius Strong, 30, of Burnsville, said in an account he posted on Facebook soon after what began as a traffic stop early Friday afternoon along Old Shakopee Road. “Just remember … anything can happen to us, man, especially Black bodies … Black people, Black men. … Racial profiling is a thing.”A statement o... (more…)

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