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A look at Egypt’s new interim president: Adly Mansour

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Egypt’s new caretaker president Adly Mansour had been head of the Supreme Constitutional Court for just two days when the army named him leader of the Arab world’s most populous state.

He takes the helm of a nation riven by deep divisions over the army’s ouster of its first freely elected president Mohamed Morsi following days of deadly clashes between his Islamist supporters and their increasingly numerous opponents.

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Ironically he was named by Morsi himself to Egypt’s top judicial post, which, following the army’s suspension of the constitution, catapulted him into political power.

The 67-year-old father of three, who won a scholarship to France’s most prestigious institute of higher education, the Ecole Nationale de l’Administration, was a long-serving judge under the regime of veteran strongman Hosni Mubarak.

But he served in the state-sponsored religious courts which deliver fatwas, or edicts, on observance, as well as in the civil and criminal courts.

Mansour helped draft the supervision law for the presidential elections that brought Morsi to power in 2012, which included setting a legal timeframe for electoral campaigning.

He was deputy head of the Supreme Constitutional Court from 1992.

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Unlike the principal leaders of the opposition — among them Nobel peace laureate Mohamed ElBaradei and former Arab League chief Amr Mussa — Mansour was never a household name, but that probably served the military’s purposes in their search for a neutral figurehead for a potentially rollercoaster transition.

The balding, mustachioed judge could probably have walked through one of the huge opposition protests that swept the country on Sunday prompting the military’s dramatic intervention without being recognised.

His photograph was never among those brandished by the million of demonstrators mobilised by the grassroots opposition to the Muslim Brotherhood’s grip on power during Morsi’s tumultuous 12 months in power.

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Here is how Jason Crow ‘pulled rank’ on John Roberts — and exposed the Chief Justice’s bias

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Former Army Ranger Jason Crow repeatedly drew upon his experience serving three tours in Iraq and Afghanistan during his prosecution of President Donald Trump as an impeachment manager.

Crow, who was awarded the Bronze Star and retired as a Captain, attended law school after his military service before successfully winning a seat in Congress during the 2018 midterm elections.

Elie Mystal, a justice correspondent for The Nation magazine, explained how Crow pulled rank on Supreme Court Chief Justice John Roberts.

Mystal broked down how Crow put Roberts in his place with the subtle question of whether senators were getting restless and needed a break.

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Rape trial told Harvey Weinstein a ‘seasoned’ predator

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Harvey Weinstein was a "seasoned" sexual predator and rapist who abused his power as a movie-producing titan to prey on vulnerable aspiring actresses, prosecutors said Wednesday as his trial heard from its first witness.

Weinstein, wearing a dark suit, shook his head as New York Assistant District Attorney Meghan Hast painted a picture of a 300-pound (140 kilogram) bully who violently raped, humiliated and manipulated several women, leaving them traumatized for years.

His defense team hit back by saying the fallen film producer engaged in consensual relationships with his accusers, including a "loving one" in which the woman called Weinstein "her casual boyfriend."

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UN report on Saudi Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman’s hacking of Bezos’s phone raises questions over other potentially compromised elites

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"If the Saudi Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman personally hacked Bezos's phone via malicious files sent over text, it seems extremely likely he's hacked heads of state the same way."

The United Nations on Wednesday called for a far-reaching investigation into allegations that Saudi Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman hacked Amazon founder Jeff Bezos's cell phone, enabling him to extract data from the device and potentially blackmail Bezos.

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