Quantcast
Connect with us

Russia considers raising divorce fees to avoid bad marriages

Published

on

Russia’s Prime Minister Dmitry Medvedev has backed a proposal to make divorce far more expensive as a way of discouraging ill-considered matches, state media reported Tuesday.

“The motives (for the suggestion) are understandable: switch on your brain when you’re getting married, otherwise there’s going to be material penalties,” the prime minister said.

ADVERTISEMENT

Medvedev, who served as Russia’s president between 2008 and 2012, was commenting on a proposal submitted by senators that would increase the state fees for divorce to almost 30,000 rubles (700 euros, $940), a huge rise from the current charge of 400 rubles (nine euros, $12.50).

Costly divorce cases are relatively rare in Russia, which has one of the world’s most lenient divorce procedures, with couples able to annul their marriages out of court in a single procedure at a wedding office. In cases where the divorce is contested, relatively little justification is required.

Karina Krasnova, a lawyer from the company Russian Divorce, told AFP: “In Russia the situation is very favourable for divorce. It’s much cheaper because you can do it independently, because you’d don’t need lawyers.”

Some, including Medvedev, have suggested that this easy-going regime, a legacy of the Soviet Union, promotes a cavalier attitude towards matrimony, leading to high rates of divorce.

ADVERTISEMENT

According to a global UN survey, Russia has the 15th highest female divorce rate and the 28th highest for men.

The Soviet Union was one of the first countries in the world to allow “no-fault” divorce requiring no justification for splitting, as the Communist state sought to destroy what it considered the bourgeois construct of the family. In the 1930s, 40% of Soviet marriages ended in divorce.

Stalin later reversed this policy, but divorce remained relatively straightforward.

ADVERTISEMENT

The discussion on reducing family break-ups coincides with a campaign by the Russian government to encourage more conservative family values in keeping with those traditionally promoted by the Russian Orthodox Church.

Monday’s proposal echoed a suggestion made earlier this year by controversial deputy Yelena Mizulina, an author of the “gay propaganda” law that made it legal to ban events that could be seen as promoting homosexuality to minors.

[Image: “Young Man And Woman Angry And Conflicting” via Shutterstock]

ADVERTISEMENT


Report typos and corrections to: [email protected].
READ COMMENTS - JOIN THE DISCUSSION
Continue Reading

Facebook

James Mattis finally fires back at Trump in a surprisingly funny charity speech

Published

on

Former US defense secretary James Mattis said he was honored to be the "world's most overrated general" in a swipe at his former boss Donald Trump who insulted him earlier this week.

At a gala charity dinner in New York Thursday evening, Mattis told diners he had now "achieved greatness."

"I'm not just an overrated general. I am the greatest, the world's most overrated," he said.

"I'm honored to be considered that by Donald Trump because he also called Meryl Streep an overrated actress," he said.

"So I guess I'm the Meryl Streep of generals, and frankly that sounds pretty good to me," he said to laughter and applause at the annual Alfred E Smith Memorial Foundation dinner.

Continue Reading

CNN

‘We’ve entered a shame-free zone’: CNN’s Sciutto appalled by Trump’s ‘mind-boggling’ G7 corruption

Published

on

CNN's Jim Sciutto on Friday did not mince words when talking about President Donald Trump's decision to host next year's G7 summit at his own golf course in Doral, Florida.

During a segment about the president's multiple corruption scandals, Sciutto described Trump's G7 gambit as the president "explicitly, publicly steering a taxpayer-funded government contract to [his] own business." He then asked former federal prosecutor Renato Mariotti to comment on why this scandal might get Trump into hot legal water.

Continue Reading
 

Facebook

Deadly Turkey air strikes shatter Trump’s hours-old ‘ceasefire’ deal

Published

on

Deadly Turkish air strikes Friday shattered an hours-old US-brokered deal to stop Ankara's military offensive against Kurdish forces in northeastern Syria.

The ceasefire announced late Thursday was meant to provide a pause for the evacuation of Kurdish fighters from the battleground border town of Ras al-Ain and other areas Turkey wants to control along its border with Syria.

The five-day suspension looked designed to help Turkey achieve its main territorial goals without fighting but its Syrian proxies continued to clash with Kurdish fighters Friday and an air strike killed five civilians.

Continue Reading
 
 
Help Raw Story Uncover Injustice. Join Raw Story Investigates for $1 and go ad-free.
close-image