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United Auto Workers withdraws objection to lost election at TN Volkswagen plant

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(Reuters) – The United Auto Workers union on Monday said it was withdrawing its objection claiming undue outside political interference in the result of a February election it lost among workers at the Volkswagen AG plant in Tennessee.

UAW President Bob King, in a statement issued by the union on Monday, said the process of objecting to the National Labor Relations Board could have dragged on for months if not years.

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King and the UAW announced the withdrawal on the morning of the scheduled start of an NLRB hearing in Chattanooga on the union’s objection.

The UAW has had no success in trying to get workers at automotive plants owned by foreign companies in the U.S. South to agree to join the union in an area where membership has fallen over the last several decades. Volkswagen officials agreed not to work against the UAW and allowed the union direct access to workers at the plant during work hours, a rarity by companies in a UAW organizing drive, which he union hoped would increase its chances of victory.

But in a Feb 12-14 election, workers voted 712-to-626 against allowing the UAW to represent them.

“The unprecedented political interference by Gov. (Bill) Haslam, Sen. (Bob) Corker and others was a distraction for Volkswagen employees and a detour from achieving Tennessee’s economic priorities,” King said. “The UAW is ready to put February’s tainted election in the rearview mirror and instead focus on advocating for new jobs and economic investment in Chattanooga.”

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During the election campaign, Republican Gov. Haslam and other Tennessee politicians threatened to cut off financial incentives to Volkswagen if the UAW were installed as labor representative of the workers. Corker, a U.S. senator and former mayor of Chattanooga, claimed during the vote that VW would not place additional work at the plant if the UAW won the election.

King said he would next try to take his case against what he called outside interference by politicians to Congress.

“The UAW will ask Congress to examine the use of federal funds in the state’s incentives threat, in order to protect Tennessee jobs and workers in the future,” the union statement said.

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(Reporting by Bernie Woodall; Editing by Lisa Von Ahn and Chizu Nomiyama)


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Trump rages against impeachment ‘lynching’ — and warns GOP will seek revenge against next Dem president

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President Donald Trump declared himself a victim of a "lynching" -- and threatened the next Democratic president with impeachment as he faces increasing calls for his removal from office.

The president raged against the impeachment inquiry that has largely been held in closed-door hearings as House Democrats investigate a possible criminal conspiracy involving classified information.

"So some day, if a Democrat becomes President and the Republicans win the House, even by a tiny margin, they can impeach the President, without due process or fairness or any legal rights," Trump tweeted. "All Republicans must remember what they are witnessing here - a lynching. But we will WIN!"

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Global millionaires now own nearly half of world’s $361 trillion in wealth

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The millionaires of the world, who account for just 0.9 percent of the global population, now own nearly half of the planet's $361 trillion in wealth while the bottom 56 percent of the population owns just 1.8 percent.

That's according to the annual Global Wealth Report released Monday by Credit Suisse, which found that the number of millionaires in the world grew to 47 million between mid-2018 and mid-2019, with the United States leading the world in both new and total millionaires.

According to Credit Suisse, the U.S. added 675,000 new millionaires over the past year, bringing the country's total to 18.6 million.

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Jimmy Carter suffers pelvis fracture in another fall at home

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Former President Jimmy Carter suffered an injury in a fall at home.

Carter, who turned 95 years old this month, fell Monday evening at his home in Plains, Georgia, and was hospitalized for treatment of a minor pelvic fracture, according to The Carter Center.

Former U.S. President Jimmy Carter had a fall yesterday evening at his home in Plains, Ga. He has been admitted to Phoebe Sumter Medical Center for observation and treatment of a minor pelvic fracture. He is in good spirits and is looking forward to recovering at home.

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