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Frontpage Commentary - 6 articles

Ted Cruz and Josh Hawley exposed as 'working-class imposters'


The Republican Party is trying to rebrand itself as te party of the working class.

Rubbish. Republicans can spout off all the catchy slogans about blue jeans and beer they want, but actions speak louder than words. But let's look at what they're actually doing.

Did they vote for the American Rescue Plan? No. Not a single Republican in Congress voted for stimulus checks and extra unemployment benefits needed by millions of American workers.

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The real reason right-wingers hate vaccines

"Go get vaccinated, America," the president urged the nation last Wednesday in his State of the Union address. Joe Biden had a lot of good news to report to the US Congress on the COVID vaccination effort: 220 million shots have been administered in his first 100 days in office, everyone over 16 is eligible and 90 percent of Americans now live within five miles of a vaccination site. Vaccine manufacturing is booming. Supply will soon no longer be a limiting factor. Yet even as eligibility has expanded, demand has plateaued across the country and vaccination rates have dipped from their peak.

Time is of the essence. More transmissible variants of the virus mean a higher percentage of the population must be immunized to reach herd immunity. We're in a race between the finest that human civilization has to offer and venal dumbassery.

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Why the right-wing is turning on Republican Gov. Kristi Noem

South Dakota Gov. Kristi Noem was a favorite of attendees at the recent 2021 Conservative Political Action Conference in Orlando, Florida, and former President Donald Trump spoke highly of her during the debut episode of Fox News pundit Lisa Boothe's new podcast. But the hard-right Republican governor is feeling the wrath of some social conservatives for her opposition to parts of a South Dakota bill that would ban transgender athletes from competing against the opposite sex in her state.

Joe Sneve, a reporter for the Sioux Falls Argus Leader, explains, "Noem's issuance of a formal recommendation for style and form modifications to HB 1217 not only drew criticism from its authors in the (South Dakota) Legislature, who said the changes she wants don't align with the policy they set out to create. And beyond that, GOP leaders like House Speaker Spencer Gosch have questioned whether the governor's use of the style and form veto is legal considering she's recommending what they say are substantive changes, not minor clerical errors."

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HBO's QAnon series 'Q: Into the Storm' is a bewildering attempt to decode a super-conspiracy

Perhaps you're familiar with TV idiom "the crazy wall." Watch any detective drama for a while and you'll encounter one. The phrase describes a large vertical board kept out of sight by a dogged protagonist or freakish suspect who knows exactly what it says about them. Said board or wall is festooned with newspaper clippings, photos, maps, and Post-It Notes with random words like "PROOF???" written on them.

What makes a crazy wall crazy as opposed to an art installation is the tangle of yarn, push pins and creative thinking connecting everything together.

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Devin Nunes received a mysterious package from a known Russian agent -- so why is he on the Intel Committee?

Rep. Devin Nunes of California is the leading Republican on the House Intelligence Committee. And MSNBC's Rachel Maddow is wondering why the far-right congressman still has that position in light of his connection to Andrii Derkach, a Russian agent and ally of Russian President Vladimir Putin.

Maddow, during her March 18 broadcast, noted that Derkach is one of the Russian agents named in a National Intelligence Council report on Russian interference in the United States' 2020 presidential election. The MSNBC host pointed out that according to the report, Derkach was "under the purview of Russian President Vladimir Putin" as part of Kremlin efforts to help former President Donald Trump win reelection and defeat now-President Joe Biden.

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After the insurrection: America’s far-right groups are getting more extreme

As the U.S. grapples with domestic extremism in the wake of the Jan. 6 insurrection at the U.S. Capitol, warnings about more violence are coming from the FBI Director Chris Wray and others. The Conversation asked Matthew Valasik, a sociologist at Louisiana State University, and Shannon E. Reid, a criminologist at the University of North Carolina – Charlotte, to explain what right-wing extremist groups in the U.S. are doing. The scholars are co-authors of "Alt-Right Gangs: A Hazy Shade of White," published in September 2020; they track the activities of far-right groups like the Proud Boys.

What are U.S. extremist groups doing since the Jan. 6 riot?

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'Traitor' pro-Trump propagandist blasted for siding with Putin over Biden

Charlie Kirk is finding Twitter less supportive these days now that the man he spent four years promoting was banned two months ago from the social media platform.

The far right wing conspiracy theorist and propagandist who created a niche by milking the right wing claim that conservative college students were being silenced – because their views were and continue to be extremely unpopular, especially among educated Americans – on Thursday decided to send some support Vladimir Putin's way.

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'Make him do it': Lindsey Graham slammed after saying he would talk until he 'fell over' to stop voting rights bill

Republican Sen. Lindsey Graham of South Carolina said this week that if Senate Democrats revive the talking filibuster in an effort to weaken the rule's power as a tool of endless obstruction, he would speak until he "fell over" to try to block passage of a major expansion of voting rights as well as legislation aiming to protect LGBTQ people from discrimination.

"I would talk 'til I fell over to make sure that we don't go to ballot harvesting and voting by mail without voter ID," Graham said in an appearance on Fox News, referring to the For the People Act. "I would talk 'til I fell over to make sure that the Equality Act doesn't become law."

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'Can't take a licking': Internet roars with laughter as museum takes down Trump sculpture people kept punching

A Ripley's-affiliated wax museum in San Antonio, Texas was forced this week to move a sculpture of former President Donald Trump into storage — because guests kept punching it in the face. It is unclear exactly when the sculpture will return, but sources suggest it will remain in storage at least until a sculpture of President Joe Biden, currently being created in Orlando, Florida can be put on display as well.

News of the Trump statue's plight was met with uproarious humor from commenters on social media, many of whom voiced their approval of the anti-Trump vandals. There were even proposals to turn the statue-punching into a charitable fundraising event.

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