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Don’t look now, but the 2020 Atlantic hurricane season could break records

Parts of the Atlantic, Pacific, and Indian Oceans saw record-high temperatures last month. Meanwhile, the average ocean temperature worldwide came in just shy of the record set in 2016.

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The Trump administration is forcing airlines to fly nearly empty planes to get coronavirus bailout money

“Sorry for the long wait,” the TSA agent joked from behind his surgical mask. It was March 28, and I was the only person in the security line at Seattle-Tacoma International Airport. I was trying to get home to San Jose, California, to quarantine with my recently widowed father. Sea-Tac was eerily, frighteningly quiet. When I got on an inter-terminal train, there were only two people on board — me and the pilot of my flight.

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‘Misinformation kills’: The dangerous link between coronavirus conspiracies and climate denial

Scientific warnings are being ignored, misinformation is spreading, and prominent Republicans have said that addressing the problem is either too expensive or too difficult. No, this isn’t climate change: This is the new reality of the novel coronavirus, the deadly pandemic sweeping the planet.

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'Hurricane truthers': How nutty conspiracy theories are putting lives in danger

First it was the moon landing, vaccines, and New Coke. Now nutty conspiracies are surrounding the life-and-death matter of hurricanes.

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The internet lost its sh*t after Andrew Yang said it was too late to stop climate change -- but is he a fearmonger or realist?

During the July debates, when CNN moderators asked Democratic presidential candidates about their plans to tackle the climate crisis, most of the responses were about what could be accomplished if we took swift action. Bernie Sanders talked up how he would ensure fossil fuel workers aren’t left behind in a lightning-quick shift to a green economy. Kirsten Gillibrand (who has since left the race) evoked JFK, comparing fighting the climate crisis with the race to put a man on the moon. Elizabeth Warren explained why the Green New Deal would boost the U.S. economy by allowing us to export green technology abroad.

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Democratic 2020 presidential candidates talked climate crisis for seven hours on CNN — and it was awesome

The greatest threat to life on earth finally got the attention it deserved on Wednesday as CNN devoted seven whole hours to interviewing presidential candidates for its Climate Crisis Town Hall. It started with Julián Castro, the former mayor of San Antonio, at 5 p.m. Eastern time and ended with Senator Cory Booker from New Jersey, who walked onto the set after 11 p.m. In all, 10 candidates fielded queries from CNN hosts, a studio audience, and questioners on video.

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Here's why companies are rebelling against Trump's so-called 'business-friendly' deregulation agenda

The Environmental Protection Agency announced plans late last week to eliminate an Obama-era rule that required oil and gas companies to monitor and control the release of the potent greenhouse gas methane during their operations.

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Lawns are the No. 1 irrigated 'crop' in America -- and they need to die

As a new homeowner, my strategy for finding a house was probably a little different than most: I looked for the one with the smallest lawn I could find.

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Here’s where the Democratic presidential candidates stand on climate

So far, 18 Democrats have announced bids to tussle with Donald Trump for the presidency in 2020, with more expected to throw their caps in the ring. In such a crowded field, it’s hard to decipher where each candidate stands on any issue, including climate change — a topic that was conspicuously absent in the 2016 election but appears will be front and center this time around. Luckily, the New York Times sent around a survey to each of the 18 declared Democratic candidates and got them all on the record about everything from a carbon tax to nuclear energy to renewables.

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Scientists are baffled by a giant spike in this greenhouse gas -- and it's not CO2

The unexpected culprit that could throw a wrench in the world’s efforts to stop climate change? Runaway methane levels. Researchers monitoring air samples have noticed an alarming observation: Methane levels are on the rise and no one’s quite sure why.

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Trump's New York buildings need to cut emissions or pay millions in fines

“Don’t mess with your hometown.” That was the message New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio had Monday afternoon for real-estate-mogul-turned-President Donald Trump, who has several properties subject to carbon emissions targets recently set by the Big Apple.

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The government is back -- and it's debunking Trump’s dumb tweets

Here’s a tip for President Trump: You may want to make sure the government is still shut down next time you fire off an inaccurate tweet about climate change. Or even better, give the pseudoscience a break and tweet about your own administration’s climate report instead!

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Scientists have opened a new front against Trump -- and have already scored some wins

During President Trump’s first two years in office, his administration has undermined science on no less than 96 occasions, according to a recent tally by Columbia University’s Silencing Science Tracker. The administration has deleted government climate change websitesexcluded experts from key decisions, and ignored science when crafting new rules.

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Trump's factually challenged tweets might be backfiring

A record number of Americans now grasp that climate change is happening and that it poses a present danger. What’s behind the big change? Believe it or not, President Trump might have something to do with it.

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What the Trump administration doesn’t want you to know about this fancy bird

2018 may be coming to a close, but the federal government’s environmental hijinks are far from over. A recent investigation found that this past spring, the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) deleted web pages containing information about the sage grouse, a species native to the American West and parts of Canada.

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