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Sales of electronic cigarettes rise, as does criticism

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Makers of electronic cigarettes are reporting strong growth in sales as anti-tobacco laws force European smokers into the cold streets, but campaigners say the device is undercutting health efforts.

Spain joined Sunday the ranks of countries that have outlawed smoking in enclosed public space after a wave of similar legislation across Europe.

For the makers of electronic cigarettes, which simulate the sensation of a cigarette and can contain nicotine, the traditionally heavy smoking nation marks a potentially lucrative market for their much-criticised product.

“We have seen sales grow by 30 percent each year since 2007 when we launched our product,” said a spokesman for EdSylver, one of the leading manufacturers of the product invented in China in 2004.

Manufacturers such as EdSylver say the plastic cigarette is not harmful for the smoker or people around them, but this claim is rejected by health experts.

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At a World Health Organisation conference in Uruguay in November, one of its leading anti-tobacco experts Eduardo Bianco said electronic cigarettes “sabotaged smoking prevention efforts”, which were designed to encourage people to quit.

The plastic cigarettes function as mini aerosols, releasing artificial smoke with or without nicotine.

“I am very happy with it, I want to repeat the feeling of smoking, without the harm of nicotine,” said one Parisian user.

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Professor Yves Martinet, head of the French National Committee Against Tobacco, said the electronic cigarette was a rip-off.

“This product offers no medical support for quitting smoking, there are some countries that have banned it,” he said.

“For the moment, this product has not been evaluated in a scientific way,” he said.

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The French national office for smoking prevention said the purpose of the electronic cigarette was “ambiguous”, and condemned its sale in pharmacies.

The office said the products were presented by manufacturers both as “an aid to quitting and a product which would allow smoking in enclosed spaces.”

Tobacco sellers meanwhile reject manufacturers’ claims that sales of the device are taking off.

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“It doesn’t sell at all, some of our members still have stocks from last year,” said Gerard Bohelay, the head of an association of tobacco retailers in the French capital.


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American Islamic State ‘sniper’ charged in New York: Justice Dept

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A naturalized American who was a sniper for the Islamic State group has been charged in New York with material support for a terror group after being captured in Syria and repatriated to the United States, the Justice Department announced Friday.

Kazakhstan-born Ruslan Maratovich Asainov fought for the Islamic State in Syria for five years before he was captured by the Syrian Democratic Forces and handed over to US custody, the department said.

Asainov, 43, was brought back to the United States on Thursday and was to be arraigned Friday afternoon in federal court in Brooklyn.

He fought for IS in Syria from 2013 to 2018 as a sniper and a weapons trainer for other combatants.

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WATCH: Employee at Tim Hortons slurs Muslim couple and tells them ‘go back to your own country’

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According to a report from Deadline Detroit, a Muslim advocacy group has filed a complaint against a local Tim Horton's location after an employee insulted a Muslim couple and told them to "go back to their own country," followed by a sexist slur.

The report states Alaa Kouider and her husband, Ameur Dhaimini, were purchasing coffee at the local fast food location when they got into an argument with the cashier.

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President Bolsonaro says claims of hunger in Brazil ‘a big lie’

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Brazilian President Jair Bolsonaro said Friday there was no hunger in the country, citing the lack of "poor people in the street with a skeletal physique" as evidence.

Speaking to foreign journalists, Bolsonaro blamed "populists" for propagating "a big lie" that some of Brazil's 209 million people did not have enough to eat.

"There is no hunger," the far-right leader said, noting Brazil "was rich in practically every type of crop".

"You don't see poor people in the street with a skeletal physique like in other countries.

"To say that there is hunger in Brazil is a populist discourse to try to win popular sympathy, nothing more than that."

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