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Maine lawmakers defeat attempt to repeal transgender protections

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The Maine legislature has voted against legislation to take away existing protections for transgender people when accessing appropriate public restrooms and other facilities by repealing part of the Maine Human Rights Act.

The Maine House of Representatives on June 7 voted 81 to 61 against “An Act to Amend the Application of the Maine Human Rights Act Regarding Public Accommodations.” The state’s Senate voted 23 to 11 to kill the bill the next day.

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“We’re very pleased that the legislature rejected this attempt to insert discrimination into the Maine Human Rights Act by rolling back vital protections for transgender people that had existed for nearly six years,” said Jennifer Levi, director of GLAD’s Transgender Rights Project. “With these votes the legislature has sent a strong bipartisan message reaffirming that all Mainers, including transgender Mainers, must be treated equally under the law, and with dignity and respect.”

“This is an important, historic victory for the transgender community,” Levi added. “LD 1046 marked the first effort to repeal established protections for transgender people. It was also first time we’ve had to defend against a bill exclusively focused on denying transgender people access to gender-appropriate bathrooms and locker rooms.”

Two months ago, Chrissy Lee Polis, a 22-year-old transgender woman, was brutally beaten by two teens as she entered the women’s rest room at a Baltimore-area McDonald’s.

The Maine legislature amended the Maine Human Rights Act in 2005 to protected transgender peoples’ right to access public accommodations.

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‘People’s lives will be lost’: Psychiatrist warns ‘sociopath’ Trump is ‘getting worse’ — and failing in coronavirus response

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President Donald Trump's psychological problems are getting worse and could be consequential as America faces a potential COVID-19 coronavirus pandemic.

MSNBC's Lawrence O'Donnell on Thursday interviewed Dr. Lance Dodes, a former assistant clinical professor of psychiatry at Harvard Medical School.

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2020 Election

‘Something really rotten’: Here’s the evidence of extensive voter suppression in Georgia’s notorious 2018 election

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As the 2020 presidential campaign cycle grinds on, there’s renewed concern about the 21st century’s newest form of warfare: cyber-sabotage of government systems, including elections and online disinformation intended to incite unrest. But as Suppressed: The Fight to Vote, a documentary from Brave New Films, makes clear, partisan voter suppression tactics with 20th-century roots remain and can thwart multitudes of voters from changing their state’s political leaders.

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The real story behind Trump’s new lawsuit against the New York Times

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Wednesday was an ominous day for freedom of the press in this country, and I want to tell you why.

You may have heard or seen that President Trump filed a libel suit against the New York Times. Perhaps you weren’t surprised: the president is known to frequently disparage the Times even as he reads it obsessively. Borrowing a page from what I’ve referred to before as a Mount Rushmore of totalitarians, Robespierre, Hitler, Stalin and Mao, Trump loves to call the press the “enemy of the people.”

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