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China province seeks to ease ‘one-child’ policy

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China’s most populous province has asked for permission to ease the one-child policy after more than 30 years, an official said Tuesday, as concerns grow over gender imbalances and an ageing population.

Guangdong in southern China wants Beijing to allow couples where just one parent is an only child to have a second baby, according to a local government official who declined to be named.

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China’s one-child policy was introduced in 1979 to curb population growth in the nation of more than 1.3 billion people, but has become increasingly unpopular as the country’s population ages.

Critics blame the policy for creating gender imbalances — sex-specific abortions are common and female infanticide and the abandoning of baby girls have also been reported.

The policy also puts huge pressure on only children to support their parents and two sets of grandparents.

Policy violations usually result in hefty fines and a cut back in social services, although some ethnic minorities and farmers whose first child is a girl are excluded from the restriction.

In some areas couples where both parents are only children are also allowed to have a second baby.

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Now, Guangdong authorities are seeking permission for some parents who are themselves only children to have more than one child.

“To allow the new policy will have little overall impact on population growth,” Guangdong family planning chief Zhang Feng was quoted by the Southern Metropolis Daily as saying.
“The increase in population is still a big problem affecting our social and economic development. But in the long term, ageing will also be a problem.”

If approved, the Guangdong trial would help alleviate problems caused by the family planning measure in the world’s most populous country, such as an ageing population that is putting pressure on the nation’s economy.

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The results of the latest nationwide census released in April show 118.06 boys were born in China to every 100 girls over the past 10 years — an imbalance attributed to the Chinese preference for male heirs and viewed as a possible source of instability.

A study last year warned more than 24 million men of marrying age could find themselves without wives in 2020.

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The 10-yearly census also found that more than 13 percent of the population was over the age of 60, up nearly three percentage points from the 2000 count.

He Yafu, an expert who is in close contact with some of China’s official demographers, told AFP last year that officials planned to launch similar pilot projects in five provinces to evaluate the effects of relaxed rules.

The proposed test provinces were Heilongjiang, Jilin and Liaoning in the northeast, Jiangsu and Zhejiang in the east.

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“Official demographers say that those five provinces have basically been determined as the first pilot provinces, and over the next five years or so it will spread to the whole of China,” He said.

The census showed Guangdong was the country’s most populous province, with 104 million residents, up from 86 million in 2004.

Much of the population increase in Guangdong, the centre of China’s booming export-oriented industry, is due to rapid rises in its migrant labour work force.

Despite the problems caused by population controls, President Hu Jintao said in April the “one-child” policy would continue, because of the increased strain on resources and government services that the population exerts.

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Team Trump wants to steal another election — and there’s only one way to beat them back

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When I was growing up at Fort Leavenworth, Kansas, back in the early 1960s, my mother drove down to Kansas City one morning to go shopping and have lunch with an old friend of her mother’s. Ladies going out shopping and having lunch in the upscale Country Club Plaza in Kansas City was almost a formal occasion. I remember she put on a summery suit and heels and stockings, and I’m pretty sure she wore a pair of white cotton gloves.

When she returned a few hours later, she wasn’t carrying any bags from the shops, and she was seething. The woman she’d eaten lunch with was married to a man who owned a chain of downtown hotels in major cities around the country. They lived in a big Tudor house in Mission Hills, the Beverly Hills of the Midwest. She drove a Cadillac. She was rich.

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#LetLevSpeak: Giuliani henchman’s attorney explains why his client wants to testify against Devin Nunes

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An attorney for indicted Rudy Giuliani associate Lev Parnas warned Rep. Devin Nunes, R-Calif., that “Lev remembers” their phone calls — even if the Intelligence Committee’s top Republican does not.Phone records obtained from AT&T and released in the Intelligence Committee’s impeachment report revealed four phone calls between Nunes and Parnas on April 12, amid the smear campaign that ousted then-Ukraine Ambassador Marie Yovanovitch, including one which lasted longer than eight minutes. Parnas, who played a key role in Giuliani’s hunt for damaging information on former Vice President Joe Biden, was later indicted on campaign finance charges. Prosecutors have said he is still under investigation for more crimes.However, Nunes now claims that he cannot not recall speaking with Parnas.
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Why are cops around the world using this outlandish mind-reading tool?

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The police gave Ricky Joyner a pen and a nine-page questionnaire.

Write what you did, beginning to end, on the day Sandra Hernandez disappeared, one question asked.

“Went ot work …,” Joyner wrote, transposing the letters in “to.” “Went home toke shower got dress pick Sandra up … went out to eat … went the movies … toke Sandra home … stop at [bar] for little while, then spent the night with a grilfriend.”

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