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Japan floods claim first victim

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Floods claimed their first victim in Japan and nearly 300,000 people were urged to flee their homes Saturday as a weather system that killed dozens on the Korean peninsula swept the country.

Local governments in the central province of Niigata and tsunami-hit Fukushima issued the guidance after the national weather agency urged citizens to be on maximum alert against more flooding and mudslides.

Helicopter footage on NHK showed bridges over the Shinano River in Niigata partially submerged, while trees and telephone polls had been knocked down.

Kamo City in Niigata was extensively flooded, with water submerging roads.

Forecasters warned that the rains could continue to be torrential after reaching 1,000 millimetres (40 inches) to date in Sanjo City, Niigata, 250 kilometres (155 miles) northwest of Tokyo, since they started Wednesday.

A total of 296,000 people had been asked to evacuate their homes by early Saturday, according to public broadcaster NHK, but no compulsory orders were issued despite muddy swollen rivers, broken dykes and flooded houses.

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The same weather saw record rainfall kill at least 59 people in South Korea earlier this week, leaving thousands more homeless.

The first Japanese victim, Eiichi Murayama, 67, was confirmed dead in Tokamachi City, in Niigata, early Saturday.

“We found a car fallen in River Nakasawa last night… and found the driver’s body downstream this morning,” an official at Niigata police said of the drowned man.

Four other people are missing in the area, including a 93-year-old woman who was swept away in a river and a 25-year-old man who was believed to have fallen into a flooding river while driving, police said.

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Officials had requested the Self-Defence Force dispatch troops to join the search for missing people and help those stranded by mudslides and floods.

A 63-year-old man was listed as missing in Fukushima, whose Pacific coasts were hit by a massive tsunami on March 11 that crippled an atomic power plant in the world’s worst nuclear disaster since Chernobyl in 1986.

More than 40 people who had spent a night in cars and buses after being stranded on a road blocked by mudslides and flooding in Fukushima were rescued unhurt.

“I couldn’t sleep. I had some food but couldn’t swallow a bite” out of fears that further mudslides would hit the stranded cars, a woman told NHK.

The weather agency has warned quake-hit regions are more prone to mudslides as the tremors had worsened ground conditions.

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New details revealed in the bizarre story of Jerry Falwell Jr, a pool boy and ‘compromising photographs’

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The New York Times has put together a lengthy report about the utterly bizarre circumstances surrounding Liberty University President Jerry Falwell Jr., former Trump "fixer" Michael Cohen, a former pool boy, and purportedly "compromising photographs."

The story begins in 2012 when Falwell and his wife enjoyed a stay at the Fontainebleau, a Florida luxury resort known for topless sunbathing and a massive underground nightclub described by one travel guide as "30,000 square feet of unadulterated fun."

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Viewers revolt after Meghan McCain slurs Joy Behar: ‘Go back to Fox News’

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Meghan McCain dropped the B-word on air during an argument with Joy Behar, and social media users were just as shocked as the "The View" studio audience.

She and co-host Joy Behar were arguing over Trump supporters when McCain blew up.

“Being the sacrificial Republican every day,” she said. “I’m just trying to — don’t feel bad for me, bitch. I’m paid to do this, okay? Don’t feel bad for me.”

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2020 Election

Florida Republicans concoct a new scheme to make it harder for students to vote

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Florida Republicans do not want to make voting easy for college students — a demographic that leans heavily Democratic.

Former GOP Secretary of State Ken Detzner, an appointee of Gov. Rick Scott, took that to the extreme in 2014, with an order banning county election officials from setting up any early voting sites on college campuses. Last year, following a lawsuit by the League of Women Voters, federal District Judge Mark Walker struck down that order as an unconstitutional burden on students' voting rights. As a result, some 60,000 people were able to vote early on 11 college campuses in Florida in 2018.

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