Quantcast
Connect with us

‘Let’s finish the fight’ against AIDS, says Obama

Published

on

US President Barack Obama on Thursday added $50 million to fight AIDS in the United States and launched efforts to treat two million more people abroad.

“We can beat this disease,” Obama said at an event to mark World AIDS Day which included speeches by satellite from former presidents Bill Clinton and George W. Bush and appearances by U2 singer Bono and pop-soul singer Alicia Keys.

“We have saved so many lives, let’s finish the fight.”

About 1.2 million Americans are among the 34 million people worldwide who were living with HIV/AIDS in 2010, a year when 1.8 million people died, down from a peak of 2.2 million five years earlier.

Despite many advances in treatment and survival since the epidemic first surfaced 30 years ago, a UN report said this week that funding dropped to $15 billion globally last year, down from $15.9 billion in 2009.

ADVERTISEMENT

Experts say that is well short of the $24 billion needed by 2015 to mount an effective global response.

As Obama battles Republican lawmakers over US budget priorities amid a mounting deficit, a White House official stressed that the new boost in funds “will all be done within existing resources and not require congressional approval.”

Internationally, Obama said the United States has set “a new target of helping six million people get on treatment by the end of 2013.”

ADVERTISEMENT

Obama said the United States currently helps four million people around the world get antiretroviral treatment, and last year gave “600,000 HIV-positive mothers access to drugs so that 200,000 babies could be born HIV-free.”

Obama also appealed to global partners, including China, to step up their efforts to end AIDS.

“Here’s my message to everyone out there. To the global community — join us,” he said.

ADVERTISEMENT

“Countries that have committed to the Global Fund need to give the money that they promised. Countries that haven’t made a pledge, they need to do so. That includes countries that in the past might have been recipients but now are in a position to step up as major donors.

“China and other major economies are in a position now to transition in a way that can help more people.”
Former president George W. Bush, who spoke by satellite from Tanzania, hailed the “great success of PEPFAR,” the US government program that in 2008 authorized $48 billion over five years to fight worldwide HIV/AIDS, tuberculosis and malaria.

“World AIDS Day is a day to celebrate success,” Bush said. “There is nothing more effective than PEPFAR,” or the President’s Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief, he added, calling the number of lives saved by the program “staggering.”

ADVERTISEMENT

Antiretroviral drugs are credited with saving 700,000 lives around the world last year alone.

Obama also described PEPFAR as one of Bush’s “greatest legacies.”

Treatment with antiretroviral drugs has been shown to suppress levels of the virus in 77 percent of people who follow the regimen, and it can cut the risk of transmission to a partner by 96 percent, studies have shown.

ADVERTISEMENT

New cases of HIV have leveled off at about 50,000 in the United States each year, with 16,000 people dying annually of AIDS.

“The rate of new infections may be going down elsewhere, but it’s not going down here in America. The infection rate here has been holding steady for over a decade,” said Obama. “This fight is not over.”

Obama said $15 million of the new funding would go to support HIV medical clinics and $35 million was earmarked for the state AIDS drug assistance programs.

ADVERTISEMENT

In Europe, 27,116 new cases of HIV infections were reported last year, an increase of around four percent from 2009.
In the United States, black men who have sex with men are a particularly high-risk group, with African-American gay males accounting for 27 percent of all new infections in the United States, according to CDC data.

“The AIDS epidemic is coming back in America, especially among gay men, primarily African Americans, and the spending programs have been pared back,” said Clinton.

“I am very worried that the death rate is going to go up in America simply because of the budgetary constraints on the states,” said the former president, whose Clinton Foundation works to get low-cost AIDS drugs to people in need.

ADVERTISEMENT

“We can all lobby for more effective expenditure of aid money, not just in the United States but around the world.”


Report typos and corrections to [email protected].
READ COMMENTS - JOIN THE DISCUSSION
Continue Reading

Facebook

Disney heiress who went undercover to Disneyland ‘livid’ at conditions and pay

Published

on

Heiress Abigail Disney went to one of her family's resorts to see conditions for workers herself and was disgusted by what she saw.

In comments to Yahoo News podcast "Through Her Eyes," Disney described how she went to Disneyland in California undercover and found that workers at the resort were treated poorly—and underpaid.

"Every single one of these people I talked to were saying, 'I don't know how I can maintain this face of joy and warmth when I have to go home and forage for food in other people's garbage,'" said Disney.

Continue Reading

Facebook

Ex-Peru president wanted for corruption arrested in the US

Published

on

Former Peruvian president Alejandro Toledo was arrested in the United States Tuesday to face extradition to his home country on corruption charges, authorities in the South American nation said.

The 73-year-old is suspected of involvement in the sprawling Odebrecht scandal in which the construction giant paid hundreds of millions of dollars in bribes throughout the continent to secure huge public works contracts.

The Peruvian attorney general's office announced on Twitter that Toledo "was arrested this morning for extradition, in the United States."

Toledo has been formally charged with receiving a $20 million payment from Odebrecht to grant it the tender to build the Interoceanic Highway that links Peru with Brazil.

Continue Reading
 

Facebook

Comic-Con mines past for future hits on 50th edition

Published

on

A smorgasbord of sequels, prequels and reunions from "Terminator" to "Game of Thrones" awaits thousands of misty-eyed comic book geeks and sci-fi nerds descending on San Diego this week for the world's largest celebration of pop culture fandom.

The 50th edition of Comic-Con International will see 135,000 cosplayers, bloggers, movie executives and humble fans pile into a sweaty convention center for glimpses of their heroes, in town to promote the next mega-hit films, TV shows and comic books.

This anniversary edition promises to be more nostalgia-laden than most -- among those expected to appear are Arnold Schwarzenegger and Linda Hamilton, who will soon reunite on screen for the first time since 1991's "Terminator 2" for Paramount's killer cyborg sequel "Dark Fate."

Continue Reading
 
 
 

Copyright © 2019 Raw Story Media, Inc. PO Box 21050, Washington, D.C. 20009 | Masthead | Privacy Policy | For corrections or concerns, please email [email protected]

close-image