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NASA considering using wind-powered robots to explore surface of Jupiter

NASA might use wind-powered robots to explore Jupiter

Engineers at the NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California are reportedly in the process of developing "windbots" – robotic probes that could stay aloft in the clouds of a distant world, and these probes may eventually be used to explore Jupiter or other gas giants. According to Mashable and Engadget, the project would ideally remain…

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Your college toothbrush probably has poop on it

If you've ever shared a bathroom with other people while living in college dorms, get ready for some bad news: You may have been brushing your teeth with someone else's poop. That's right. According to a new report being presented at the annual meeting of the American Society…

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Rescue workers help make 3-D printed prosthetic beak for sea turtle injured by boat propeller

Chuck Bednar for redOrbit.com – @BednarChuck A sea turtle that was wounded by a boat's propeller will soon be able to head back into the water after receiving a 3D-printed prosthetic beak. This is thanks to the efforts of animal rescue workers and an additive manufacturing company, various media outlets are reporting. According to Engadget, the…

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Hawaii's Kilauea volcano showing signs of an imminent eruption

Brett Smith for redOrbit.com – Your Universe Online Kilauea, on the Big Island of Hawaii, is one of the more active shield volcanoes in the Aloha State and observers at the United States Geological Survey are saying that the odds of a major eruption have increased significantly in recent days. "Activity at the summit of Kīlauea…

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First warm-blooded fish discovered off California's coast

NOAA Fisheries biologist Nick Wegner holds an opah caught during a research survey off the California Coast. (Credit: NOAA Fisheries/Southwest Fisheries Science Center) While conducting research off the coast of California recently, NOAA Fisheries scientists discovered that the opah, or moonfish, is the first fully warm-blooded fish. Capable of circulating…

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Scientists created chicken embryos with Velociraptor-like snouts -- here's why

This is just…strange. Scientists at Yale apparently created chicken embryos with Velociraptor-like snouts in place of beaks, according to a statement they released yesterday. While it would have been really odd/interesting to see these things walking around, the embryos (somewhat thankfully) didn't survive to hatch. "They actually probably wouldn't have…

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Ants use math to plan their routes

Eric Hopton for redOrbit.com – Your Universe Online Ants' movements seemingly hide or mirror mathematical patterns. If we could tap into their inaudible squeaks they might just be saying to each other "Hey, shall we use Gaussian and Pareto distributions for this one, buddy?" Authors of a new study found apparently random changes in the direction…

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Sperm grown in lab for the first time ever

In what is being hailed as a potential breakthrough in the treatment of male infertility, a team of researchers from a private French research center has grown human sperm cells in a laboratory for the first time ever. While the findings have yet to be published in a peer-reviewed journal,…

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Scientists explain why wild political rumors like 'death panels' are so hard to kill

John Hopton for redOrbit.com – @Johnfinitum Mark Twain said, "A lie can travel half way around the world while the truth is putting on its shoes," and new research has shown that once the lie gets out there, it stays out there. Adam Berinsky, a professor of political science at MIT, authored a study which found…

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Males are still necessary -- even in asexually reproducing species

Males still necessary, even in asexually reproducing species

Despite evolutionary adaptations that have allowed female members of some fish, reptile, and amphibian species to reproduce by cloning themselves, a new study published online recently in The Science of Nature shows that males still play an important role in reproduction. Researchers from the Okinawa Institute of Science and Technology…

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Search of 100,000 galaxies found no alien life

An in-depth search for advanced extraterrestrial civilizations has come up empty, as a team of astronomers searched 100,000 galaxies and found no evidence that there are any alien societies belonging to Wookies, Klingons, or Sontarans out there in outer space. No Wookies?! We are trying to hold back our tears.…

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How glitter could help find extrasolar planets

Typically, glitter is something that you expect to find in a grade-school classroom, but the small, flat reflective particles are serving as the inspiration for a new type of reflective mirror that could help NASA develop a low-cost new type of space telescope mirrors. Those telescopes, the US space agency…

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Facebook causes self-objectification in women

Television and other media are often criticized for objectifying women, but a new study from a team of Australian and British researchers has found that women are more likely to compare their appearance to photos of other women in magazines and on Facebook, rather than women on TV.…

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Oldest man-made stone tools discovered in Kenya

Archaeologists have reportedly discovered the oldest tools ever created by human ancestors: Stone flakes that have been dated to 3.3 million years ago, or 700,000 years before the oldest previously-identified tools used by the predecessors of modern mankind. According to Science, the discovery (if confirmed) would indicate that tools were…

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Researchers observe female chimps making spears

Female chimpanzees create spears in order to stab their prey, suggesting that the ability to craft these kinds of weapons originated with early primates and that ancient humans may have hunted in a similar manner, according to a new Royal Society Open Science study. The authors of that paper observed…

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