Can we rebuild the country after Trump?

Can we rebuild the United States after President Trump is gone? And how would we do it?

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Here are 10 things you need to know about socialism

What do we mean when we talk about “socialism”? Here are ten things about its theory, practice, and potential that you need to know.

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How this database is tracking and exposing cops' bigoted Facebook posts

It’s a good day for a chokehold.

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Trump's national emergency creates another border crisis

There’s a corridor within the Lower Rio Grande Valley through which rare and endangered species of wildlife move freely from Mexico into a national refuge and across the rest of South Texas. It’s an oasis for rare birds and butterflies, ocelots, and other wildlife.

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Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez is symbolic of a new cultural turning point in America

This week we may have passed a cultural milestone.

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How first-time voters led change in deep-red Oklahoma

The midterm elections of 2018 have been portrayed as a strong victory for Democrats looking to put a check on the excesses of President Donald Trump. But there’s a warning embedded in the results.

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This isn’t the first time white supremacists have tried to cancel birthright citizenship

In the latest in a long string of attacks on immigration, this week Trump declared he would issue an executive order ending birthright citizenship. Established by the 14th amendment to grant citizenship to freed slaves, the idea that all people born in the United States are U.S. citizens, regardless of race or where their parents came from, has long been upheld by the courts and the Constitution. But this is not the first time White supremacists have tried to restrict the rights of citizenship along racial lines.

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The midterms are more than a vote against Trump --- here is what's really on the line

Midterm elections often get “nationalized,” becoming a comment on the party in power rather than a vote for representation. But in 2018, more is at stake than a vote against President Trump.

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Here's how voter registration is inherently racist

What if we had an election and everyone came?

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Here's what the mapping of hate groups reveals about white supremacy in America

Organized hate groups span all geographic areas of the United States, from White nationalists in Washington state to neo-Nazis in Alabama to radical traditionalist Catholics in New Hampshire. While persecution of classes of people happens everywhere, the drivers that push people to join hate groups are unique to specific places. In this way, hatred can be a study in geography as much as anything else.

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Does #MeToo have the power to take down a Supreme Court nominee?

The #MeToo movement does not exist to change the minds of misogynists—male or female. It is not about standing up, waving our arms, and screaming, “Hey, this violence happens to our bodies all the time and you should care!”

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Danny Glover on new film 'Sorry to Bother You' and the dangerous illusion of postracial America

Boots Riley’s debut film, Sorry to Bother You, offers a renewed sense of urgency in how we respond to the racist and capitalist divides that impact us all. Satirical, dystopian, part sci-fi. Emotionally and intellectually, it’s everything we didn’t know we needed.

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The surprisingly oppressive history of coffeehouses

An 18th-century ad tells us that a dozen or so men, women, and children of African heritage were scheduled for buyer’s inspection one Saturday, just outside the entrance of the London Coffee House in Philadelphia. The Stamp Act protests and other famous anti-British demonstrations took place not far from the auction block where this enslaved group would have stood chained, their naked bodies ready for prodding and probing. The establishment owner, William Bradford, published—in his newspaper The Pennsylvania Journal, books and other materials—the works of revolutionaries such as Thomas Paine, in addition to the Declaration of Rights from the First Continental Congress. The Founding Fathers and other influential, wealthy men came to this venue to talk politics, make deals, and often to buy and sell human beings.

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This artist finds neo-Nazi swastika graffiti and transforms its into cartoons

Public spaces are for everyone, but how we perceive them and interact with them is contextual. Some activists are making statements on public canvas all around the world. And it’s catching on.

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