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Singing flashmob hijacks health insurance conference

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Theatrical protest group “Billionaires for Wealthcare” has done it again.

During the American Health Insurance Plans’ (AHIP) annual State issues conference in Washington, D.C. on Friday, Wealthcare members infiltrated the group and interrupted health industry pollster Bill McInturff’s speech with cheers of thanks for his “good work.”

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However, kind words floating from the back of the room at the Capitol Hilton Hotel quickly turned into a full-blown musical number thanking the insurers for blocking a public health insurance option, set to the tune of “Tomorrow, Tomorrow.”

The group called its performance “Public Option Annie,” a guerrilla musical.

“The groups Health Care for America Now and MoveOn.org also bombarded the health insurance conference, hosted by America’s Health Insurance Plans, with hundreds of protesters and families with stories of being denied care by the insurance companies,” CBS News reported.

Health Care for America Now recently blasted AHIP with a television ad decrying its report that claimed insurance premiums would skyrocket over 100 percent for working families if the Senate Finance Committee’s health reform bill were to pass.

The report was characterized by President Barack Obama as “bogus” and became the target of ire among congressional Democrats, who suggested that it actually provided a major reason to support the public option as a way of injecting market competition and keeping rates on private plans down.

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AHIP did not respond to a request for comment by CBS News.

This video was published to YouTube by BillsForWealthcare on Oct. 23, 2009.

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