Quantcast
Connect with us

Palin lies about hunting from helicopters in new book

Published

on

Alaska Gov. Sarah Palin is taking a lot of heat over purported inaccuracies in her new book, Going Rogue.

Among the less-known is a claim Palin makes that Alaskans don’t shoot wolves from helicopters, a fanciful image touted by liberals in the 2008 presidential campaign.

Referring to a prank call where she thought she was talking to French President Nicholas Sarkozy, Palin writes that the prankster “suggested we get together and hunt from helicopters, which Alaska hunters don’t do.”

ADVERTISEMENT

“Then [the fake] Sarkozy started talking about hunting and suggested we get together and hunt from helicopters, which Alaska hunters don’t do (despite circulated Photoshopped images of me drawing a bead on a wolf from the air).”

But Media Matters for America has found that the aerial hunting program wasn’t just something Alaska hunters do — its a program Palin herself endorsed.

“In 2007, Palin introduced a bill to ‘simplify and clarify Alaska’s intensive management law for big game and the state’s ‘same day airborne hunting’ law,’ which she stated would ‘give the Board of Game and state wildlife managers the tools they need to actively manage important game herds and help thousands of Alaskan families put food on their tables,'” the group notes.

On Sunday, Palin attacked the Associated Press for questioning claims in her book.

ADVERTISEMENT

Former Alaska Governor lashed out at the Associated Press Sunday for doing a fact-check on her memoir, “Going Rogue.”

“Amazingly, but not surprisingly, the AP somehow nabbed a copy of the book before it was released,” she wrote on her Facebook page. “They’re now erroneously reporting on the book’s contents and are repeating many of the same things they spewed during the campaign and afterwards. We’ve heard 11 writers are engaged in this opposition research, er, “fact checking” research!”

The AP reported that Palin’s account often contradicted her record as well as current events. Her depiction of the McCain campaign is also frequently at odds with internal campaign emails.

Alaska state wildlife officials do target wolves under a program aimed at protecting caribou and moose. Reported the Anchorage Daily News in 2008:

State wildlife officials believe they have saved more than 1,400 moose or nearly 3,000 caribou — or some combination thereof — with a winter program to kill wolves from aircraft, although the wolf kill remains far below what the state wanted.

Pilot-gunner teams have taken 124 wolves to date, according to Bruce Bartley, spokesman for the Alaska Division of Wildlife Conservation. The goal was 455 to 670 wolves.

ADVERTISEMENT

Correction: The original version of this story suggested that Palin had introduced legislation regarding wolf hunting. The legislation did not in fact specifically refer to wolves.


Report typos and corrections to: [email protected].
READ COMMENTS - JOIN THE DISCUSSION
Continue Reading

CNN

CNN’s Toobin says all evidence points to Trump running an extortion scheme for political dirt

Published

on

On Monday's edition of CNN's "Anderson Cooper 360," chief legal analyst Jeffrey Toobin laid out how all the evidence points to President Donald Trump attempting to extort Ukraine for political dirt — even the evidence Trump himself has put forward to the public voluntarily.

"May 14th, Trump tells Vice President Pence not to attend Zelensky, the Ukrainian president's inauguration," said Cooper. "July 18th, Trump decides to withhold nearly $400 million in aid to Ukraine that's already been passed by Congress. July 25th is that Trump and Zelensky phone call. I mean, I don't know if it's, you know, if it begins with the call from Putin, but there certainly is a lot of activity, a lot of dominos falling."

Continue Reading

Breaking Banner

Connecticut town’s KKK history recalled ahead of controversial upcoming GOP event

Published

on

The town of Shelton, Connecticut was brutally whacked for its history of racism ahead of a Connecticut Republican Party event.

"Fun fact. In the 1980s, the Imperial Wizard (the national leader) of the Ku Klux Klan lived in Connecticut," columnist Colin McEnroe noted in The Middletown Press.

The host of WNPR's "The Colin McEnroe Show" explained how James Farrands ran the KKK out of his garage in Shelton.

"This may be an unfair memory to bring up, right when Shelton is having another bad run. In recent weeks, the school system there had to deal with a Snapchat pic of a student in blackface lifting both middle fingers and using a common distasteful racial epithet," McEnroe explained.

Continue Reading
 

CNN

Trump’s attack on congressional legitimacy ‘boggles the mind’: Ex-Whitewater counsel

Published

on

On Monday's edition of CNN's "OutFront," former Whitewater senior counsel Paul Rosenzweig and anchor Erin Burnett discussed how Alexander Hamilton warned about leaders like Trump in his writings — and the president's stunning declaration of the impeachment probe as "crap" and "illegitimate."

"Historian Ron Chernow, whose biography on Hamilton is the biography, the one used for the Broadway musical, wrote an op-ed in the Washington Post," said Burnett. "He says Hamilton, who was a defender of executive power, would have supported impeaching Donald Trump. He cites one of his Federalist Papers, where Hamilton writes, in part, 'When a man unprincipled in his private life, desperate in his fortune, bold in his temper ... when such a man is seen to mount the hobby horse of popularity to take every opportunity of embarrassing the general government and bringing it under suspicion, it may justly be suspected that his object is to throw things into confusion that he may ride the storm and direct the whirlwind.' Hamilton warning such a leader will become a demagogue and a tyrant ... Does it sound like Hamilton, even so long ago, could have been warning about a person like President Trump, Paul?"

Continue Reading
 
 
Help Raw Story Uncover Injustice. Join Raw Story Investigates for $1 and go ad-free.
close-image