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GOP flubs attempt to counter ‘lude’ pranksters

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Not satisfied with URL-shortening services like Tinyurl.com and Bit.ly, which are evidently not conservative enough in the way they shorten Internet addresses, the Republican Party has launched its own.

GOP.am‘s motto is “making long URLs … conservative.” But unlike most other address-shortening services, GOP.am doesn’t just take you to a Web site via a short address — it puts the Web site underneath a banner that features the GOP logo.

And that makes for some interesting opportunities for anti-Republican pranksters — such as placing the GOP logo above some very non-Republican (or, as some would have it, some very Republican) bondage sex sites.

According to Wired.com, that’s exactly what happened on Monday, the first day that GOP.am was operational, when pranksters used the URL-shortening service to put the GOP’s logo on Web sites that embarrassed the GOP so badly that it temporarily pulled the service offline.

Wired reported Tuesday morning that GOP.am was offline, but as of Monday afternoon, the Web site appeared to be operational again. And it continues to place the Republican logo on any Web site that browsers visit via a GOP.am shortened address.

A disclaimer at the bottom of the screen warns, “If you use [GOP.am] for spamming, illegal purposes or to promote lude [sic] content, your GOP.AM URL will be disabled.”

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(Unless the Web site has a specific ban on promoting quaaludes, we imagine the webmaster meant “lewd.”)

And with such a tempting target at hand, Raw Story couldn’t help but create one link to, ahem, an “embarrassing” Web site for the GOP. (Don’t worry — we’ve kept it safe for work.)

So here it is: “The Demise of the Republican Party,” as framed by the GOP logo…

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2020 Election

Ta-Nehisi Coates: ‘Joe Biden shouldn’t be president’

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Democratic presidential contender Joe Biden is under fire for fondly reminiscing about his “civil” relationship with segregationist senators in the 1970s and 1980s. Speaking at a fundraiser at the Carlyle Hotel in New York City on Tuesday night, Biden expressed nostalgia for his relationship with the late Democratic pro- segregation Senators James Eastland of Mississippi and Herman Talmadge of Georgia. Biden reportedly said, “I was in a caucus with James O. Eastland. … He never called me 'boy'; he called me 'son.'” Biden went on to say, “A guy like Herman Talmadge, one of the meanest guys I ever knew, you go down the list of all these guys. Well, guess what. At least there was some civility. We got things done.” Biden was widely criticized by other Democratic presidential contenders, including Cory Booker, Kamala Harris, Bernie Sanders, Elizabeth Warren and Bill de Blasio. We speak with acclaimed writer Ta-Nehisi Coates about Joe Biden’s long record on the wrong side of civil rights legislation, from opposing busing in the 1970s to helping to fuel mass incarceration in 1990s. Coates says, “Joe Biden shouldn’t be president.”

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Canada is taking advantage of Trump’s tariff pratfalls by scooping up new trade partners: report

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As American manufacturers reel and U.S. farmers see their economic well-being being destroyed by Donald Trump's trade wars, the Canadian government is stepping into the breach and boosting their own trade relations, reports Politico.

As part of their Global Translations podcast, Politico notes that countries -- and manufacturers -- are not standing by helplessly as Trump threatens and changes directions on trade on almost a daily basis.

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Lost version of Delacroix masterpiece discovered in Paris

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A newly discovered version of Eugene Delacroix's Orientalist masterpiece, "Women of Algiers" went on display for the first time in Paris on Thursday.

The lost study for the painting by the French Romantic painter which inspired generations of artists including Paul Gauguin, Vincent van Gogh and Paul Cezanne was discovered in a Paris apartment 18 months ago.

Since then experts have been retracing its history and carrying out X-ray and infra-red tests on the picture.

Like the much larger version in the Louvre, it shows a reclining wealthy woman and a black servant.

The canvass disappeared after it was sold in 1850 by the French diplomat Charles-Edgar de Mornay, with whom the painter went to North Africa in 1831, shortly after the French conquest of Algeria.

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