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Palin: Obama’s foreign policy speech could’ve come from me

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WASHINGTON — President Obama’s speech Thursday in Oslo where he accepted the Nobel Peace Prize appears to have placated his political opponents and struck a nerve with his supporters. He’s receiving kudos from one of the most unlikely sources: Sarah Palin.

Following an interview with the former vice presidential candidate and fierce Obama critic on Thursday, USA Today reports that Palin “praised” him for his speech in Oslo, and “said the president’s defense of war to combat evil could have been taken from the pages of her memoirs.”

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“I liked what he said,” Palin told USA Today. “I talked too in my book about the fallen nature of man and why war is necessary at times.”

The speech “sounded really familiar,” Palin said. “Of course, war is the last thing I believe any American wants to engage in, but it’s necessary. We have to stop these terrorists.”

A flurry of conservatives were livid when it was announced that Obama received the Nobel Peace Prize. But they’re largely happy with Obama’s speech at Oslo, as well as his decision to escalate U.S. troop presence in Afghanistan.

Former Republican leader Newt Gingrich said it was “actually very good,” adding that Obama “clearly understood that he had been given the prize prematurely, but he used it as an occasion to remind people, first of all, as he said: that there is evil in the world.”

“The irony is that George W. Bush could have delivered the very same speech,” said Bradley A. Blakeman, Republican strategist and former Bush official. “It was a truly an American president’s message to the world.”

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Obama’s speech and his Afghanistan move have ruffled feathers in the progressive base and defied key Democrats who strongly hold the view that it’s unnecessary and counterproductive — including Sen. Russ Feingold (D-WI) and Rep. Dennis Kucinich (D-OH).

Many liberals criticized him for touting the virtues of war too heavily, agreeing with conservatives that many of his declarations were reminiscent of those Bush often made.

Palin is winding down her cross-country tour promoting her new book, “Going Rogue.”

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ma’s speech Thursday in Oslo where he accepted the Nobel Peace Prize appears to have placated his political opponents and struck a nerve with his supporters. He’s receiving kudos from one of the most unlikely sources: Sarah Palin.

Following an interview with the fierce Obama critic on Thursday, USA Today reports that Palin “praised” him for his speech in Oslo, and “said the president’s defense of war to combat evil could have been taken from the pages of her memoirs.”


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‘Saber-toothed tiger’ skeleton up for auction

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