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BBC probe casts doubt on Lockerbie evidence

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LONDON — A BBC investigation has cast doubt on key evidence in the case against the Libyan convicted of blowing up a US jet over the Scottish town of Lockerbie in 1988, the broadcaster said Wednesday.

A tiny fragment of the timer allegedly used to blow up Pan Am flight 103 — crucial in linking Abdelbaset Ali Mohmet al-Megrahi to the bomb — was not properly tested and was also unlikely to have survived the explosion, it said.

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Megrahi was jailed in 2001 for the attack which left 270 people dead, but was controversially released from his Scottish prison in August 2009 because he was suffering from terminal cancer and only had months to live.

Investigators believe the plane bomb was contained in a Toshiba radio cassette player inside a brown suitcase with various items of clothing, and was triggered by a digital timer that was later linked to Libya.

But according to the BBC’s Newsnight programme, the fragment of the timer — found embedded in a charred piece of clothing three weeks after the bombing — was never tested to confirm if it had actually been in a blast.

The BBC also quoted an explosives expert, John Wyatt, who recreated the suitcase bomb 20 times and found that each time, the timer and its circuit board were completely destroyed — casting serious doubt on the fragment found.

“I do find it quite it extraordinary and I think highly improbable and most unlikely that you would find a fragment like that — it is unbelievable,” Wyatt, the UN’s explosives consultant for Europe, told the programme.

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It is not the first time doubts have been raised about the timer fragment — in 1995, a British lawmaker suggested it could have been planted by the CIA.

A review by the Scottish Criminal Case Review Commission also cast doubt on evidence linking Megrahi to the clothes in the suitcase and concluded in 2007 that “a miscarriage of justice may have occurred”.

Megrahi, who has always protested his innocence, subsequently launched a second appeal but dropped this in anticipation of his release.

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The devolved Scottish government’s decision to release him caused a diplomatic row with the United States, home to many of the victims, and the British government in London.


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German police identify ‘murder’ suspect in Madeleine McCann case

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Police revealed Wednesday they have identified a new suspect in the disappearance of British girl Madeleine McCann in 2007, saying the 43-year-old German man with a history of child sex abuse may have killed her.

The suspect, who was not named, is serving a "long prison sentence" for an unrelated matter, said Germany's federal criminal agency.

He has previous convictions over child sexual abuse, the agency added.

"In connection with the disappearance of the then three-year-old British girl Madeleine Beth McCann... the Braunschweig public prosecutor's office is investigating a 43-year-old German citizen on suspicion of murder," said federal police in a statement.

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‘They don’t understand what it means to be American’: Ex-Pentagon chief blasts White House

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White House press secretary Kayleigh McEnany explained Wednesday that President Donald Trump went to St. John's Church with his Bible because it's what former President George W. Bush did after Sept. 11 and what Winston Churchill did during World War II. The problem, of course, being that protesters demanding an end to police brutality aren't the same as Al-Qaeda or the Nazis and it's police killing unarmed Americans, not Black Lives Matter.

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‘Comically ridiculous’: Kayleigh McEnany sparks outrage by comparing Trump to Winston Churchill

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At Wednesday's White House briefing, Press Secretary Kayleigh McEnany compared President Donald Trump's church photo-op stunt to British Prime Minister Winston Churchill inspecting bombing damage during the Nazi raids in World War II.

Kayleigh compares the President’s photo op to Churchill inspecting bombing damage pic.twitter.com/KP5ovHMYzI

— Acyn Torabi (@Acyn) June 3, 2020

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