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US firm kicked out of Peru mining group for pollution

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LIMA (AFP) – Peru‘s mining, oil and energy association (SNMPE) said Saturday it has expelled US mining company Doe Run from its roster for not cleaning up its pollution problems, which environmentalists say are among the worst in the world.

“It has not shown… any willingness to comply with its environmental commitments and its obligations to the country, its workers, the La Oroya population and its creditors,” SNMPE said in a statement.

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Doe Run in 1997 took over La Oroya mining complex and the Cobriza copper mine in Peru’s central Andean mountain region, where it mines for lead, copper, zinc, silver, gold and a series of byproducts including sulfuric acid.

The US company’s La Oroya mining operation was listed in 2007 by the international environmental group Blacksmith Institute as the sixth worst polluted site in the world.

SNMPE said expelling Doe Run from the association would not affect its mining business, but noted that the company was presently in “a serious financial crisis.”

The association said Doe Run had notified Peruvian authorities it would be unable to comply with an environmental clean-up program it assumed when it began working in Peru.

The Energy and Mining Ministry said Doe Run had only complied with 52 percent of the 2006 PAMA environmental program in La Oroya and needed another 160 million dollar investment to complete it according to plan.

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SNMPE said Doe Run’s “lack of interest in completing PAMA violates the association’s ethical principles and code of conduct,” earning it its expulsion.

The US mining company had already been suspended from SNPE in late June.


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‘Checkmate’: Legal experts agree remaining Trump election challenges won’t ‘amount to anything’

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President Donald Trump has exhausted nearly all of his options for overturning his election loss to Joe Biden, legal experts agree.

Trump continues flinging lies about voter fraud from his Twitter account, and only a few highly improbable options remain before Biden is inaugurated next month, reported Bloomberg.

“It’s checkmate in terms of the various chess moves on the board, but they could try go for other moves anyway,” said Edward Foley, director of an election-law program at Ohio State University. “Normally when you see that it’s going to be checkmate, you sort of concede.”

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With rent due and evictions looming, Elizabeth Warren rips Mitch McConnell for ‘disgraceful’ obstruction

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With another rent payment due Tuesday for millions of Americans, Sen. Elizabeth Warren called out Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell and his fellow Republicans for continuing to stonewall an adequate coronavirus stimulus bill that would prevent mass evictions that are just around the corner and provide desperately needed relief to the unemployed.

"For nine months, this tsunami on the horizon has been completely predictable and entirely preventable; we've known the solution to this for months, [the problem] is the lack of political will."—Diane Yentel, National Low Income Housing Coalition"The rent is due... and Majority Leader McConnell and the Senate GOP still haven't reinstated the $600 unemployment checks, extended unemployment programs, passed rental assistance, or anything else in months to help struggling families during this crisis," the Massachusetts Democrat tweeted Monday. "It's disgraceful."

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Chinese probe lands on Moon to collect lunar samples

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A Chinese probe sent to the Moon to bring back the first lunar samples in four decades successfully landed on Tuesday, Beijing's space agency said.

China has poured billions into its military-run space programme, with hopes of having a crewed space station by 2022 and of eventually sending humans to the Moon.

The latest mission's goal is to shovel up lunar rocks and soil to help scientists learn about the Moon's origins, formation and volcanic activity on its surface.

The Chang'e-5 spacecraft -- named for the mythical Chinese moon goddess -- "landed on the near side of the Moon late Tuesday," state media agency Xinhua reported, citing the China National Space Administration.

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