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Obama: ‘I’d rather be a really good one-term president’

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WASHINGTON — One day before his first State of the Union address, President Obama bluntly said his performance in office is more important to him than winning a second term.

“I’d rather be a really good one-term president than a mediocre two-term president,” he said Monday in an interview with ABC’s Diane Sawyer.

The remark came after an awkward moment when Sawyer asked the president if the job was ever so difficult that he would consider not running for a second term.

“You know, there is a tendency in Washington to believe our job description, of elected officials, is to get reelected,” he continued. “That’s not our job description. Our job description is to solve problems and to help people.”

Obama also addressed the issue of transparency in Washington in response to Sawyer’s question about special deals cut with senators to secure votes on the health reform package.

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“Let’s just clarify,” Obama said. “I didn’t make a bunch of deals. There is a legislative process that is taking place in Congress and I am happy to own up to the fact that I have not changed Congress and how it operates the way I would have liked.”

He added that passing major reforms is “an ugly process and it looks like there are a bunch of back room deals,” admitted he had made a “mistake.”

“I think your question points out to a legitimate mistake that I made during the course of the year, and that is that we had to make so many decisions quickly in a very difficult set of circumstances that after awhile, we started worrying more about getting the policy right than getting the process right,” the president said.

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Obama’s interview is also drawing attention because he gave Sawyer a kiss at the opening of their exchange. Video is available here.

This video is from ABC’s World News, broadcast Jan. 25, 2010.

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Download video via RawReplay.com


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Trump’s racism is ‘disqualifying’ for him to remain as president: former White House lawyer

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Former acting Solicitor General Neal Katyal explained on MSNBC on Thursday why he viewed President Donald Trump's racist attacks on four women of color in Congress as disqualifying.

Anchor Brian Williams read a quote from Susan Glasser of The New Yorker.

"Half of the country is appalled but not really sure how to combat him; the other half is cheering, or at least averting its gaze. This is what a political civil war looks like, with words, for now, as weapons," Glasser wrote.

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Lawrence O’Donnell reports on the growing movement for the impeachment of President Donald Trump

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Anchor Lawrence O'Donnell reported on the growing movement for the impeachment of President Donald Trump during Thursday evening's "The Last Word" on MSNBC.

"The House of Representatives conducted a symbolic vote on a hastily written impeachment resolution by Democratic Congressman Al Green in reaction to the president’s tweeted comments that the House of Representatives voted to condemn as racist," O'Donnell reported. "The impeachment resolution had nothing to do with the [Robert] Mueller investigation and referred only to the president being unfit for office because of the language that he has used recently about members of Congress and immigrants and asylum seekers."

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Video proves how far the Trump’s GOP has gone from the era of Ronald Reagan and HW Bush

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The immigration policies of Donald Trump’s presidency would have no room for his GOP predecessors Ronald Reagan or George H.W. Bush—who both embraced work visas, family unification, easy border crossings and a better relationship with Mexico.

That counterpoint can be seen in a very short video clip from the 1980 presidential election where Reagan and Bush—who became Reagan’s vice president for two terms before winning the presidency in 1988—were asked about immigration at a campaign debate in Texas. Their responses show just how far to the right the Republican Party’s current leader, President Trump, and voters who have not left the GOP to become self-described political independents, have moved on immigration.

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