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Terror adviser: All Gitmo detainees who returned to terror released by Bush

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In a letter to congressional leaders released Monday, the counterterror chief for President Barack Obama says that a review has found that no detainees released on Obama’s watch have returned to terror — but that in cases where they may have, the Bush Administration was responsible. (Read the letter in PDF format by clicking the image below.)

“I want to underscore the fact that all of these cases relate to detainees released during the previous administration and under the prior detainee review process,” assistant to President Obama for homeland security and counterterrorism John Brennan wrote in a letter to House Speaker Nancy Pelosi (D-CA), obtained by ABC News. “The report indicates no confirmed or suspected recidivists among detainees transferred during this Administration, although we recognize the ongoing risk that detainees could engage in such activity.”

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Jake Tapper of ABC News first posted the letter online.

The “Intelligence Community assesses that 20 percent of detainees transferred from Guantanamo are confirmed or suspected of recidivist activity,” Brennan adds, saying that about 9.6 percent are allegedly “confirmed” to have returned to militant activity, with another 10 percent being suspected.

The review was conducted by “60 career prosecutors, agents, analysts and attorneys from across the government, including civilian, military, and intelligence officials,” Brennan wrote. “Every decision to transfer a detainee to a foreign country during this Administration has been made unanimously by all agencies involved with the review process after a full assessment of intelligence and threat information.”

According to Tapper, classified information was also included with the letter. That material has not been released publicly.

Pentagon claims for the recidivism of Gitmo detainees to terrorist activity have been hotly contested.

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According to an analysis by a New Jersey law professor conducted in 2009, the Pentagon’s recent survey alleging that one in seven Guantanamo Bay prisoners return to terrorism was deeply flawed.

His analysis revealed the Pentagon had refused to identify 60 percent of the men they claim have returned to terrorism, saying the information was classified.

The 2009 recidivism analysis documents 74 recidivists, but lacks 45 names, adding that of the 29 names given, only half are labeled “confirmed” recidivists. Seton Hall University Professor Mark Denbeaux, who wrote the report, also alleges the analysis includes men who were never held at Guantanamo.

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All told, 45 of 74 is 61 percent.


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GOP scrambling to find delegates willing to attend Trump’s convention after he bailed on North Carolina: report

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On Saturday, The New York Times reported that Republicans are struggling to find delegates to attend the GOP convention.

"Adding to the uncertainty surrounding the convention is the trepidation delegates are feeling about attending a crowded gathering," reported Annie Karni and Maggie Haberman. "Already, states like Indiana are having difficulty filling both their delegate and alternate spots. Many convention delegates are over 60 and therefore more vulnerable to the virus."

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Jim Cramer: Coronavirus pandemic triggered ‘one of the greatest wealth transfers in history’

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CNBC's Jim Cramer said Thursday that that coronavirus pandemic has triggered "one of the greatest wealth transfers in history."

The remark from the network's "Mad Money" host came amid "ominous" economic data but a rebounding stock market.

"How can the market rebound without the economy? Because the market doesn't represent the economy; it represents the future of big business," said Cramer. "The bigger the business, the more it moves the major averages."

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Black Lives Matter movement gains momentum worldwide with fresh weekend of protests

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From Sydney to London, Paris to Washington, D.C., protesters have launched a global weekend of action to support Black Lives Matter, in many cases defying bans on public gatherings.

Taking a knee, chanting and ignoring social-distancing measures, outraged protesters kicked off a weekend of global rallies Saturday against racism and police brutality.

The death during the arrest of George Floyd, an unarmed black man in the US state of Minnesota, has brought tens of thousands out onto the streets during a pandemic that is ebbing in Asia and Europe, but spreading in other parts of the world.

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