Quantcast
Connect with us

Air Force pulls ad following legal threat from White Stripes

Published

on

WASHINGTON — Add the White Stripes to the long list of rockers that have purged their music from politically-charged campaigns they don’t support.

The Detroit alternative rock duo consisting of Jack and Meg White has lashed out at the United States Air Force for using their song “Fell In Love With A Girl” in a recruitment ad that aired during the Super Bowl.

ADVERTISEMENT

Posted on their main page whitestripes.com is a cutting letter explicating in no ambiguous terms the band’s dissatisfaction with the Air Force’s use of their works without permission. The duo said they “have not licensed” the song and “plan to take strong action” if the ad isn’t pulled.

The band posted a clip of their song and a link to the Air Force ad on top of their Web site.

“The White Stripes take strong insult and objection to the Air Force Reserves presenting this advertisement with the implication that we licensed one of our songs to encourage recruitment during a war that we do not support,” read the statement.

The Air Force appears to have adhered to their demand, pulling the ad from the Web page at which it was previously located.

Shielding in advance any criticisms that they don’t back the troops, the duo clarified that they “support this nation’s military” but “simply don’t want to become a cog in the wheel of the current conflict.”

ADVERTISEMENT

The band has over the years released several commercially successful albums as well as earned respect in the underground rock community. The song in question appeared on the band’s 2002 album White Blood Cells.

The following is a screen capture of the message posted on the band’s Web site.

ADVERTISEMENT


Report typos and corrections to: [email protected].
READ COMMENTS - JOIN THE DISCUSSION
Continue Reading

Facebook

Montreal ends electric scooter experiment, citing ‘disorder’

Published

on

Montreal on Wednesday called a halt to its electric scooter scheme, saying that riders broke rules and almost always parked illegally.

The Canadian city launched a pilot project in June with 680 scooters and electric bikes, but authorities judged that the test period had been a "failure."

Eric Alan Caldwell, head of city transport, lambasted "an 80 percent delinquency rate" in complying with traffic and safety regulations.

"Only 20 percent of scooters were parked" in dedicated spaces, the city said in a press release, adding that the scooters created "disorder" and problems for pedestrians.

Continue Reading

Facebook

Bill Barr’s threat to resign has already compromised his credibility to do his job: Ex-FBI official

Published

on

On Wednesday, former FBI counterintelligence official Frank Figliuzzi suggested that Attorney General William Barr has already compromised his position enough by putting out his threat to resign, that he might as well go through with it — or be fired.

"If there is a pardon that further undermines justice that was made out by career prosecutors so much so that — so tainted, so contaminated that four career prosecutors quit the case, would a pardon necessity a resignation from the attorney general?" asked host Nicolle Wallace.

"I think we've already answered this question. It's rhetorical," said Figliuzzi. "This has to be run through the Justice Department. Barr had a chance to say no to the pardons. And I don't think he's going to do it."

Continue Reading
 

Breaking Banner

‘I was on my own fact finding mission’: Ex-Congressman denies Trump was in on scheme to float a pardon to Assange

Published

on

Former Rep. Dana Rohrabacher (R-CA) swears Julian Assange is lying.

An Al Jazeera reporter said Wednesday that Assange revealed to him that President Donald Trump would pardon him if he denied that Russia hacked the Democratic National Committee. The go-between, according to Assange, was Rohrabacher.

"At no time did I talk to President Trump about Julian Assange," the former Congressman said. "Likewise, I was not directed by Trump or anyone else connected with him to meet with Julian Assange. I was on my own fact finding mission at personal expense to find out information I thought was important to our country."

Continue Reading
 
 
close-image