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Rove denies Bush admin said oil would help pay for war

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NBC was the latest stop on Karl Rove’s book tour for ‘Courage and Consequence.’ Revising history has been his main focus recently, and this morning’s interview with Tom Brokaw focused on Iraqi oil revenues.

Addressing a Congressional panel, former Deputy Defense Secretary Paul Wolfowitz claimed that Iraqi oil revenues would help pay for reconstruction of the country. Sunday, Karl Rove denied the Bush administration ever made that claim.

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“[T]he suggestion that somehow or another the administration had as its policy, ‘We’re going to go in to Iraq and take their resources and pay for the war’ is not accurate,” Rove told NBC’s Tom Brokaw.

Wolfowitz’s statement at the time, according to Think Progress was, “The oil revenue of that country could bring between 50 and 100 billion dollars over the course of the next two or three years. We’re dealing with a country that could really finance its own reconstruction, and relatively soon.”

Before the March 2003 launch of the Iraq invasion, then-White House press secretary Ari Fleischer said Iraq “is a rather wealthy country. … And so there are a variety of means that Iraq has to be able to shoulder much of the burden for their own reconstruction.”

Frank Rich’s new column in the New York Times, published before Rove’s appearance on Meet the Press, is about what he calls the ‘Rove-Cheney Assault on Reality.’

“Now the revisionist floodgates have opened with the simultaneous arrival of Karl Rove’s memoir and Keep America Safe, a new right-wing noise machine invented by Dick Cheney’s daughter Liz and the inevitable William Kristol. This gang’s rewriting of history knows few bounds.”

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The US has spent tens of billions of dollars on reconstruction, which led an auditor to warn of waste and fraud.

This video is from NBC’s Meet the Press, broadcast March 14, 2010.



Download video via RawReplay.com

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2020 Election

More than one dozen Trump officials violated Hatch Act in month before the election

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Although President Donald Trump has tried to undermine the United States' system of checks and balances, watchdogs in Washington, D.C. have been keeping a close eye on him — and according to the watchdog group Citizens for Responsibility and Ethics in Washington, 16 members of the Trump Administration committed violations of the Hatch Act in order to promote his reelection campaign in October.

In an article published on CREW's website on Monday, November 2 — the day before the 2020 presidential election — CREW reporters Donald K. Sherman and Linnaea Honl-Stuenkel explain, "during the month of October, at least 16 Trump Administration officials have violated the Hatch Act a total of more than 60 times, in an unprecedented and escalating assault on the rule of law and the democratic process. President Trump has allowed — and encouraged — senior officials to use their government roles to take actions benefiting his reelection effort in its final weeks and days as Americans are casting their ballots."

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2020 Election

GOP congressman gets #StopTheStupid trending big-time against Donald Trump — but there’s a catch

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The hashtag #stopthestupid was trending last night on Twitter thanks to -- of all people -- a conservative Republican congressman from Michigan named Paul Mitchell. But before anyone gets too excited that Republicans are discovering integrity, there’s an asterisk: Mitchell is retiring in January.

Here’s what the exasperated congressman tweeted Sunday night in response to Trump’s lunatic ranting about the election outcome:

https://twitter.com/RepPaulMitchell/status/1333214085341712388?s=20

Sunday night, there were more than 21,000 tweets featuring #stopthestupid, many of them wondering aloud why more Republicans cannot show the spine and integrity displayed by Mitchell. Most presumably don’t realize, however, that he’s leaving Congress after just two terms in office.

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The Arab uprisings were weakened by online fakes

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The Arab uprisings a decade ago were supercharged by online calls to join the protests -- but the internet was soon flooded with misinformation, weakening the region's cyber-activists.

When Tunisian dictator Zine El Abidine Ben Ali fled the country in January 2011, rumours and uncertainty created "panic and hysteria", said ex-activist and entrepreneur Houeida Anouar.

"January 14 was a horrible night, so traumatic," she said. "We heard gunfire, and a neighbour shouted 'hide yourselves, they're raping women'."

As pro-regime media pumped out misinformation, the flood of bogus news also spread to the internet, a space activists had long seen as a refuge from censorship and propaganda.

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