Quantcast
Connect with us

British economy in ‘great danger’, trades union warns

Published

on

The government’s programme of drastic spending cuts is putting the British economy in “great danger”, the Trades Union Congress has warned ahead of its annual conference opening in Manchester on Monday.

The cuts will affect economic activity, undermine confidence and could lead to higher unemployment which is “stuck” at around two and a half million, with young people particularly badly hit, the TUC’s general council said in a statement.

ADVERTISEMENT

In next month’s comprehensive spending review the Government will start to withdraw 32 billion pounds from the economy in tax rises and spending cuts from April 2011, on top of the 8.9 billion already taken out during the current financial year, the TUC leaders said.

“There is therefore scant prospect that the private sector will now create the new jobs needed,” they added.

“Falling confidence suggests a stagnant labour market and at best a jobless recovery. But the prospect of further deep public spending cuts makes even this look like an optimistic scenario, as both public sector staff and employees in the many companies that depend on the public sector for orders lose their jobs.

Making hundreds of thousands of public servants redundant at a time of such cuts and with reduced redundancy pay when there is little or no chance of finding private sector employment is “callous”, the union organisation said.

The TUC warned that deep cuts to public services, benefits and tax credits are bound to have more impact on those with low incomes, adding: “Women, disabled people and those from black and minority ethnic communities are likely to be among the biggest victims of the cuts and the greater inequality they will bring.

ADVERTISEMENT

“Unlike cuts, tax increases need not bear down on those least able to afford them, and can reduce inequality across society as a whole.”

The TUC also warned that major redundancies, a public sector pay freeze at a time of rising prices and large-scale reorganisations in many services, particularly the National Health Service, will “seriously damage” morale amongst public sector workers.

Echoing a warning given earlier this week by TUC general secretary Brendan Barber, the general council said: “Real terms pay cuts, privatisation and restructuring, job cuts and threats to pensions all adds up to a volatile cocktail that could give rise to difficult and damaging disputes, and the TUC stands ready to support and co-ordinate union action where members decide that industrial action is necessary to defend services and those who deliver them.”

ADVERTISEMENT

Next week’s conference will hear calls for co-ordinated strikes to defend public services and jobs.


Report typos and corrections to: [email protected].
READ COMMENTS - JOIN THE DISCUSSION
Continue Reading

Breaking Banner

White House chief of staff Mick Mulvaney caught on tape saying US is “desperate”

Published

on

White House Chief of Staff Mick Mulvaney was caught on tape admitting that, despite President Donald Trump's policy preferences, the United States is "desperate" for more immigrants, according to a recording obtained by the Washington Post.

He further undermined the administration's claims of its economic prowess, admitting that immigration is necessary for sustained economic growth.

"We are desperate — desperate — for more people," Mulvaney said, according to the post, stressing that it should be legal. "We are running out of people to fuel the economic growth that we've had in our nation over the last four years. We need more immigrants."

Continue Reading

Latest Headlines

Death of Prince heir complicates estate settlement even more

Published

on

MINNEAPOLIS — The death of Prince’s brother Alfred Jackson, along with his contested will, are raising new questions in the endlessly complicated efforts to settle the legendary musician’s estate, including whether a California man with a reputation for cozying up to celebrities will end up with one-sixth of Prince’s riches.Jackson, one of six sibling heirs to a fortune worth at least $100 million, sold 90% of his Prince estate rights last year to Primary Wave, a well-funded and growing entertainment company that invests in music publishing and recording rights. Prince’s sister Tyka Nelson als... (more…)

Continue Reading
 

U.S. News

Berkshire Hathaway ready for aging Buffett to go, he says

Published

on

Octogenarian billionaire Warren Buffett assured shareholders on Saturday that his Berkshire Hathaway empire, with holdings in major American firms, is ready for him and his longtime partner Charlie Munger, 96, to go.

But he did not name a successor.

Dubbed the "Oracle of Omaha," Buffett is known for his track record of brilliant investing but also for his folksy and humble persona, as well as his philanthropy.

"Charlie and I long ago entered the urgent zone," Buffett, 89, quipped in his annual letter to shareholders.

"That's not exactly great news for us. But Berkshire shareholders need not worry: Your company is 100 percent prepared for our departure."

Continue Reading
 
 
close-image