Quantcast
Connect with us

Files say David Kelly wasn’t murdered, but doubts still abound

Published

on

The British whistleblower who was behind revelations that the UK government had “sexed up” a dossier on Iraq before the 2003 invasion did indeed commit suicide, say newly-released medical reports.

But at least some of the doctors who have called for a full inquiry are skeptical of the results, arguing there is “nothing new” in the years-old post-mortem reports the British government released Friday morning.

ADVERTISEMENT

Dr. David Kelly was found dead in a field near his home in Oxfordshire in 2003, shortly after he was revealed to be the source of a BBC leak that accused Tony Blair’s government of exaggerating the threat posed by Saddam Hussein. His death prompted suspicions among many that he may have been killed in retaliation for the leak.

Kelly himself had predicted he would be “found dead in the woods” if the UK invaded Iraq.

A 2004 inquiry by Lord Hutton concluded that Kelly had died of self-inflicted wounds, but Hutton sealed the medical examinations that led to that conclusion for 70 years, ostensibly to protect Kelly’s family. The move intensified suspicions of a government cover-up in Kelly’s death. Earlier this year, Britain’s new coalition government ordered the documents unsealed.

“Today’s reports undermine those who have questioned the official version of events, as the conclusions of the postmortem examination by Dr Nicholas Hunt matched those in Hutton’s original report,” reports The Guardian.

But not everyone is convinced. Michael Powers, one of nine doctors who earlier this year signed a letter calling for a new, full inquiry into Kelly’s death told the BBC there is “nothing new” in the documents and there continues to be “major conflict” over how much blood was found at the scene of Kelly’s death.

ADVERTISEMENT

“I don’t believe any of the evidence that we have seen or heard to date can answer those questions,” he said.

In August, the detective who found Kelly’s body said there “wasn’t much blood about” at the scene. That would contradict the conclusion that Kelly had died by slitting his wrists, which usually results in large amounts of blood spilling. The doctors’ group said it was “extremely unlikely” that Kelly had died by his own hand.

“Insufficient blood would have been lost to threaten life,” they said. “Absent a quantitative assessment of the blood lost and of the blood remaining in the great vessels, the conclusion that death occurred as a consequence of hemorrhage is unsafe.”

ADVERTISEMENT

But one of the reports released Friday stated that there was “heavy bloodstaining over [Kelly’s] left arm” and a two- or three-foot long blood puddle next to him.

“It is my opinion that the main factor involved in bringing about the death of David Kelly is the bleeding from the incised wounds to his left wrist,” stated a report from Dr. Nicholas Hunt. “Had this not occurred he may well not have died at this time.”

ADVERTISEMENT

There is also controversy over whether Kelly’s body was moved to a different location after it was discovered. A paramedic who was at the scene said last month that the body had “obviously” been moved, which would have explained why there was so little blood at the scene, as at least two witnesses claim.

“I’ve seen more blood at a nosebleed than I saw there,” the paramedic said.

“There is no evidence from the postmortem or my observations at the scene to indicate that the deceased had been dragged or otherwise transported to the location at which his body was found,” Dr. Hunt’s report concluded.

ADVERTISEMENT

Prior to his death, Kelly was reportedly upset at the treatment he had received from the British government, which had evidently identified him publicly as the source of the BBC leak.

His widow, Janice Kelly, said he had felt “totally let down and betrayed” by the UK Ministry of Defence. “I have never known him to be as unhappy as he was then,” she said.

In the wake of the documents’ release, Britain’s attorney general, Dominic Grieve, is “considering whether there is evidence” for a full inquest into Kelly’s death.


Report typos and corrections to: [email protected].
READ COMMENTS - JOIN THE DISCUSSION
Continue Reading

Latest Headlines

Former tennis coach sentenced to 6 months in college admissions scandal

Published

on

AUSTIN, Texas — Former University of Texas men’s tennis coach Michael Center was sentenced to six months in prison Monday for accepting $100,000 in 2015 to help the son of a Silicon Valley venture capitalist get into the school by falsely designating him as a skilled athlete worthy of a scholarship to play for Center’s nationally ranked program.Center, 55, received the sentence in a federal courtroom in Boston from U.S. Judge Richard Stearns, in whose court Center pleaded guilty last April to a single count of conspiracy to commit mail fraud and honest services mail fraud.Center is the 15th pe... (more…)

Continue Reading

Latest Headlines

Key California reservoir to be drained due to earthquake risk

Published

on

SAN JOSE, Calif. — In a dramatic decision that could significantly impact Silicon Valley’s water supply, federal dam regulators have ordered Anderson Reservoir, the largest reservoir in Santa Clara County, to be completely drained starting Oct. 1.The 240-foot earthen dam, built in 1950 and located east of Highway 101 between Morgan Hill and San Jose, poses too great of a risk of collapse during a major earthquake, the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission, which regulates dams, has concluded.“It is unacceptable to maintain the reservoir at an elevation higher than necessary when it can be reduc... (more…)

Continue Reading
 

Breaking Banner

Critics of sweeping policy changes always make one huge mistake: Robert Reich

Published

on

In last Wednesday night’s Democratic debate, former South Bend mayor Pete Buttigieg charged that Senator Bernie Sanders’ policy proposals would cost $50 trillion. Holy Indiana.

Larry Summers, formerly chief White House economic advisor for Barack Obama, puts the price tag at $60 trillion. “We are in a kind of new era of radical proposal,” he told CNN.

Continue Reading
 
 
close-image