Quantcast
Connect with us

FCC’s ‘Net neutrality’ plan would permit super-tiers, network traffic throttling

Published

on

Internet providers will not be subjected to so-called “Net neutrality” rules and may experiment with tiered, usage-based pricing and “network management” practices, according to new rules being considered by the Federal Communications Commission this month.

Advocates of Net neutrality had hoped the regulatory agency would mandate Internet service providers treat all traffic equally: one of the Web’s founding principles.

ADVERTISEMENT

Instead, the FCC’s Internet regulations adopts many proposals by search and telecom giants Google and Verizon, with the caveat that wireless telephone providers not block competing voice applications.

In a speech, FCC Chairman Julius Genachowski specified that the FCC would permit ISPs to charge heavy bandwidth users even more, creating a tiered pricing structure. ISPs would also be able to charge fees to businesses serving large quantities of data.

The announcement is a victory for Comcast, the nation’s largest cable Internet provider, which recently forced a bandwidth toll upon Netflix partner Level 3. The company called Comcast’s move “extortion” but agreed to their conditions to prevent any service interruptions.

“With this action, Comcast demonstrates the risk of a ‘closed’ Internet, where a retail broadband Internet access provider decides whether and how their subscribers interact with content,” the company’s chief legal officer said in a media advisory.

Comcast insisted the move had nothing to do with Net neutrality.

ADVERTISEMENT

The company has been leading the charge among ISPs to establish tiered-based pricing systems. Comcast admitted in 2008 that it uses “network management” practices to speed up some data transfers and slow down others, and users of peer-to-peer file sharing services have complained to the FCC that the provider has blocked their transfers altogether.

Tiered pricing structures are already in place for many communications providers like AT&T and Cricket, which offer wireless broadband services. Verizon said it would implement similar pricing structures in the coming months.

The FCC’s rules would permit the practice on wired networks as well. Both Comcast and Time Warner, two of America’s largest wired broadband providers, have already experimented with the practice.

ADVERTISEMENT

A Texas-based trial run of Time Warner’s bandwidth caps saw users paying nearly $30 a month for 768 kilobits-per-second access, with a limit of 5 gigabytes per month and a $1 fee for each gigabyte they went over. One step-up on their pricing tier had users paying nearly $55 for true broadband speeds of 15 megabits-per-second, with a limit of 40 gigabytes per month.

Public advocates say the move may ultimately force heavy Internet users to consume less bandwidth and stay tied to television subscriptions over cable and satellite. Comcast, which is in the process of merging with NBC-Universal, stands to benefit tremendously from the arrangement.

ADVERTISEMENT

The American Cable Association’s (ACA) claimed the merger “will send monthly cable bills higher by billions of dollars over the next decade.”

Major corporations have long sought a way to charge and earn more for bandwidth, ever since Enron attempted to create a bandwidth trading market where space in data pipes would be traded as a commodity like oil or gold.

On wired Internet, which is expected to dramatically decrease in relevance in the coming years as fourth-generation wireless networks proliferate, a “public Internet” would be protected from bandwidth throttling. Companies, however, would be permitted to experiment with establishing super-tiers for preferred traffic, but must justify why individual services should be separated from the public Internet.

ADVERTISEMENT

The FCC would additionally require broadband providers to disclose their network management practices.

The chairman’s proposal lines up closely with a bill proposed by Rep. Henry Waxman (D-CA), who campaigned on pledges to institute Net neutrality rules. His bill, however, completely undermined those principles, but Democrats scrapped the legislation in Sept.

The commission was expected to vote on the measure during it’s Dec. 21st meeting.


Report typos and corrections to: [email protected].
READ COMMENTS - JOIN THE DISCUSSION
Continue Reading

Breaking Banner

‘Coming out as pro-fascist’: GOP’s Matt Gaetz slammed after he suggests hunting down ‘Antifa’ like ‘those in the Middle East’

Published

on

As unrest continues to wrack American cities this Monday, Rep. Matt Gaetz (R-FL) took to Twitter and decided to contribute some inflammatory rhetoric to an already volatile situation.

"Now that we clearly see Antifa as terrorists, can we hunt them down like we do those in the Middle East?" he tweeted.

https://twitter.com/mattgaetz/status/1267513356853919744

Unsurprisingly, Gaetz's choice of words riled his critics in Twitter.

Sure Matt. Can we hunt down white supremacists too? https://t.co/4tNV7iEYcr

Continue Reading

Commentary

Trump’s new order: Lawlessness mixed with brutal clampdown

Published

on

Despite headlines and news reports replete with loaded terms like "looting" and "riots," the real story of this past weekend was not the behavior of people on the streets protesting police violence. It was a story of numerous local police departments, emboldened by a wannabe fascist president, turning brownshirt against the ordinary people they are supposedly there to serve and protect. Make no mistake about it: This is a police uprising against American citizens. That's the true narrative.

As my colleagues at Salon spent the weekend documenting, the police assaulted, arrested, shot and gassed journalists, and even ran over peaceful protesters in an outburst of rage at the public for objecting to unchecked police power. In doing so, they were, egged on by Donald Trump. Police in Minneapolis set the tone by using tear gas against peaceful protesters on Tuesday, and ever since cops across the country have been doing everything they could to shift the headlines away from "protest" to "riots" by attacking protesters until they fight back or turn to property destruction.

Continue Reading
 

Breaking Banner

Spurs coach Gregg Popovich unloads on ‘unfit’ Trump — calls Ted Cruz and Lindsey Graham cowards for refusing to act

Published

on

In an interview with The Nation, legendary San Antonio Spurs coach Gregg Popovich railed against President Donald Trump, Sen. Ted Cruz (R-TX) and Sen. Lindsey Graham (R-SC).

“The thing that strikes me is that we all see this police violence and racism, and we’ve seen it all before, but nothing changes," he told The Nation. "That’s why these protests have been so explosive. But without leadership and an understanding of what the problem is, there will never be change. And white Americans have avoided reckoning with this problem forever, because it’s been our privilege to be able to avoid it. That also has to change.”

Continue Reading
 
 
You need honest news coverage. Help us deliver it. Join Raw Story Investigates for $1. Go ad-free.
close-image