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Group plans to beam free Internet across the globe from space

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The charity group A Human Right said it was planning to purchase a satellite that would provide free basic Internet access to developing countries around the world.

The group, which was founded by 25-year-old Kosta Grammatis, is currently raising money to buy the TerreStar-1, the largest commercial communications satellite ever built. TerreStar, the company that owns the satellite, filed for chapter-11 bankruptcy protection in October 2010, opening the possibility that the satellite may be up for sale.

The group hopes to raise $150,000 to finalize a business plan, investigate the legal and business aspects of submitting a bid for the satellite, and hire engineers to turn the plan into a reality. After this initial phase, the group plans to develop an open source low cost modem that could be used to connect to the satellite and finalize plans with partner governments.

“We believe that Internet access is a tool that allows people to help themselves – a tool so vital that it should be considered a universal human right,” the website for Buy This Satellite stated. “Imagine your digital life disconnected. Without access to the 100 million man-hours that have been put into Wikipedia, how much do you actually know?”

Nearly 5 billion out of the world’s 6.9 billion people don’t have access to the Internet.

A Human Right plans to finance their satellite by allowing telecommunication companies to purchase bandwidth, while providing basic service for free to everyone. “Our goal is to not only get everyone online, but also facilitate the growth of an industry,” their website said.

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The group has already managed to raise $44,781.

“The idea for global connectivity was born in Berlin, Germany in an innovation ‘Do-Tank’ called Palomar 5,” according to the group. “Thirty people under the age of thirty came together to innovate on what the future might look like, and how to address some of the worlds problems.”

“In Egypt we’ve watched as the government, in an unprecedented way, shutoff Internet access for the entire country,” Grammatis told TIME. “We’re building a system that can’t be shutoff–it’s as decentralized as possible. You could jam the signal somewhat, but to do that at the scale of a country is a very very difficult task.”

“Big ideas, that can improve our society as a whole, are worth doing, and this one will be done,” he added. “It’s the logical next step in communications: a network available to anyone everywhere for minimal cost.”

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Similarly, President Obama announced Thursday his plan to get 98 percent of the United States connected to the Internet in five years.

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Everything you need to know about the Green New Deal

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From its historic inspiration, to how AOC introduced the term to the mainstream and its main policy prescriptions

What is the Green New Deal?

Chances are that, regardless of which Democrat receives the 2020 presidential nomination, the concept of a Green New Deal will feature prominently into his or her subsequent campaign. It may be a program that is fully endorsed by the nominee, followed only in part or outright eschewed. Regardless, it is inconceivable that Americans won't be talking about a Green New Deal in 2020 — and so it is instructive to understand exactly what a "Green New Deal" actually represents.

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Is Trump setting the stage for a Chernobyl in America?

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According to a columnist for the Daily Beast, HBO's widely praised mini-series about the nuclear power plant accident in Chernobyl in 1986 should serve as a cautionary tale during the Donald Trump era which has seen the White House choose political ideology over science.

Noting that Chernobyl creator, Craig Mazin has pointed out that he was motivated to create the miniseries as a "riposte to the global war on truth," the Beast's Clive Irving said Americans would be wise to sit up an take notice.

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Womankind’s giant leap: who will be the first female moonwalker?

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Who will take the giant leap for womankind?

More than fifty years after the end of the Apollo program, NASA plans to return to the Moon by 2024 as a "proving ground" to test the next generation of spacecraft ahead of an eventual crewed mission to Mars.

The new program has been named Artemis after Apollo's twin-sister in Greek mythology, and the space agency has said that the mission will see the first woman to stride the lunar surface.

So, who will she be? No one knows for sure, but it's a likely bet the candidate will be selected from among NASA's current roster of 12 female astronauts.

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