Quantcast
Connect with us

Dem. leaders consider forcing Oregon’s Wu out of office after sex allegations

Published

on

UPDATE 10:16 ET: Rep. Wu has announced that he will not resign his House seat over allegations of an unwanted sexual encounter, but that he will not seek reelection in 2012, according to a breaking news alert from Politico.

“He isn’t going to be running for reelection,” an anonymous Wu adviser told Politico. “But he hasn’t done anything that rises to the level of requiring him to resign.”

ADVERTISEMENT

EARLIER: Party leaders in the House and within the greater Democratic Party are considering ways they can force Oregon Rep. David Wu out of office after recent allegations that the congressman forced himself on a young woman, Politico reported.

The daughter of one of Wu’s southern California friends and donors called the congressman’s office in tears this spring, accusing Wu of an “unwanted sexual encounter” over Thanksgiving. Wu also made headlines for his erratic behavior, such as circulating pictures of himself wearing a tiger costume, and sending aides bizarre late-night emails signed with his children’s names. Staffers urged him to seek psychiatric help, and reportedly avoided scheduling public appearances for him.

Rep. Nancy Pelosi (D-CA), with other Democrats, is reviewing options to remove Wu from the House after the latest incident. She could call for his resignation, or insist that he be investigated by the Ethics Committee. Wu spoke with congressional leaders Saturday (the news of the encounter broke late Friday night), but no details of the conversation have been released, and no formal action has yet been taken.

The seven-term congressman represents Oregon’s largest urban district, covering much of Portland and its suburbs. As a student at Stanford University, Wu was informally disciplined by the school after an ex-girlfriend accused him of forcing her to have sex with him.


Report typos and corrections to: [email protected].
READ COMMENTS - JOIN THE DISCUSSION
Continue Reading

Breaking Banner

Trump continues pushing conspiracy theories about Joe Scarborough — immediately after reporter tells him about widower begging him to stop

Published

on

At Tuesday's White House press briefing, President Donald Trump was asked by reporters if he was aware of the letter from the widower of deceased congressional aide Lori Klausutis, begging the president to stop promoting conspiracy theories that she had been murdered by former representative and MSNBC host Joe Scarborough.

The president replied, "Yeah I have." However, almost immediately after, he used the moment to continue pushing the conspiracy theory, adding, "As you know, there's no statute of limitations."

Asked if he's seen the distressed letter from the widower of Lori Klausutis about Trump turning her death into fodder, Trump says "yeah I have," then continues propagating his conspiracy nonsense, then says, "As you know, there's no statute of limitations."

Continue Reading

Breaking Banner

Trump tells a reporter to take off coronavirus mask and stop being ‘politically correct’

Published

on

At Tuesday's White House coronavirus press briefing, President Donald Trump got into an argument with Reuters correspondent Jeff Mason, when he commanded him to take off his protective face mask.

Mason refused to do so, at which point Trump mocked him, saying "You want to be politically correct."

Trump also repeated a line previously made by his press secretary Kayleigh McEnany, asking why former Vice President Joe Biden wore a mask when he was in public but not standing close to anyone, when he wasn't wearing a mask at home with his wife right next to him.

Continue Reading
 

Breaking Banner

DOJ dropping investigation into GOP senator’s stock trades ignites outrage: ‘Quid pro quo, baby’

Published

on

On Tuesday, the Justice Department ended its investigation into three senators accused of insider trading, including Sen. Kelly Loeffler (R-GA), all of whom sold stocks around the time they were receiving classified hearings on the coronavirus pandemic. Their investigation against Sen. Richard Burr (R-NC), however, continues.

There are some differences between the Burr case and the others, including that Burr admits to having ordered the trades himself whereas Loeffler says a financial adviser made the trades without her knowledge.

Continue Reading
 
 
You need honest news coverage. Help us deliver it. Join Raw Story Investigates for $1. Go ad-free.
close-image