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Dem campaign committee: Support ‘Occupy,’ beat GOP

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The Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee (DCCC) sent a petition to supporters, asking them to back the Occupy Wall Street protests against corporate greed.

The DCCC, which tries to elect Democrats to the House of Representatives, is the latest left group to come out in support of the protests that have spread across the country, joining unions, anti-war groups and fellow Democrats in grouping themselves with the growing movement.

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An email sent to DCCC supporters Monday promotes the protests, The Hill reported.

“Protestors are assembling in New York and around the country to let billionaires, big oil and big bankers know that we’re not going to let the richest 1% force draconian economic policies and massive cuts to crucial programs on Main Street Americans,” the email read in part.

The protest in New York’s Zuccotti Park has been ongoing for more than three weeks, and hundreds of people are still camping out every night in the lower Manhattan park the group has claimed.

Organizers of the protest tweeted last week to clarify that the protest is non-partisan.

“We don’t want to be the democratic tea party or liberal tea party,” the tweet read. “We want to be our own movement separate of any political affiliation.”

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The DCCC framed the protests as a way to directly oppose Republican leadership, who have publicly denounced the movement. House Majority Leader Eric Cantor (R-VA) Friday called the protests “growing mobs” and said that the occupation “concerned” him.

“Help us send a message straight to Eric Cantor, Speaker Boehner, and the rest of reckless Republican leadership in Congress,” the DCCC email read.


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North Carolina is a delegate prize on Super Tuesday. But it’s a complicated one

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