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Feingold: Occupy Wall St. ‘will make the tea party look like a tea party’

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Add Russ Feingold to the list of prominent names backing Occupy Wall Street.

The former Wisconsin senator sat down for an interview with the Washington Post‘s Greg Sargent and stated how the protests will outdo its right-wing counterpart.

“This is like the Tea Party — only it’s real,” he said. “By the time this is over, it will make the Tea Party look like …a tea party.”

“I’m really encouraged by what I’m seeing. People around the country are finally organizing to stand up to the huge influence of corporations on government and our lives. This kind of citizen reaction to corporate power and corporate greed is long overdue.”

Feingold expressed disagreement with critics who say that the protests have lacked a coherent message.

“The guys who are protesting are not filing legal briefs,” he said. “They are expressing the populist, genuine view that people have been ripped off. It’s a fundamental identification of the fact that people are getting taken for a ride by powerful interests who are getting away with murder.”

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Feingold also urged President Barack Obama to understand how pivotal the movement could be for his chances at a second term.

“The White House should realize that this would be beneficial to the president and his reelection chances if he recognizes how correct the protesters are to be upset,” he said. “It would be a mistake to try to coopt this. I’m hoping a mass movement will encourage the White House to listen to and respond to these concerns. It would be politically smart and the right thing to do.”

Feingold joins House Dems and Progressive Caucus figures Rep. Raul Grijalva (D-AZ) and Rep. Keith Ellison (D-MN) as the most well known Democratic figures to support Occupy Wall Street.

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Here are 4 winners and 9 losers from the first 2020 Democratic primary debate

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With ten candidates on stage Wednesday, the opening debate of the 2020 Democratic primary in Miami was a packed mess. And this was only the first course in a two-part event — 10 more candidates will debate on the following night.

A crowded field makes it difficult to stand out, and that means that even after a big night like a debate, the most likely result is that not much changes. But the debate was still significant, giving candidates the chance to exceed, meet, or fall below expectations for their performances.

Here's a list — necessarily subjective, of course — of the people who came out on the top when the dust was settled, and those who came out on the bottom.

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Here are 3 ways Julián Castro stood out in the first Democratic Debate

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There were many predictions going into the first Democratic debate on MSNBC, but no one predicted that Julián Castro would break out from the crowd.

Check out the top three ways Castro stood out from the crowd.

Immigration:

The former Secretary of Housing and Urban Development was the outright winner of the immigration section of the debate

It should "piss us all off," Castro said about the father and his little girl who were found face-down in the shores of the Rio Grande River this week. “It’s heartbreaking."

Castro is a second generation American who got into specifics on immigration policy, calling for an outright "Marshall Plan" style of action for Guatemala and Honduras. He joined with other Democrats calling for an end to President Donald Trump's family separation policy, but he then suggested ending the "metering" of legitimate asylum seekers.

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Trump tweets bizarre graphic showing himself as the leader for over 50,000 years

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President Donald Trump appeared to try and turn the attention back to him in a series of bizarre Wednesday night tweets.

In one, he promoted a fake TIME magazine graphic showing himself running for office for the next 1,000 years. Trump, who has a history of creating fake TIME magazine covers, didn't comment on it, but it showed the campaign yard sign saying, "Trump 2020, Trump 2024, 2028," well into the year 3,000 to 40,000 and beyond.

It then says "Trump 4Eva."

Trump has made casual "jokes" about being jealous at the Chinese president, who he refers to as a "king."

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