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Former WI Gov. Tommy Thompson files for Senate race

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Tommy Thompson, the former governor of Wisconsin, officially filed his paperwork to become a Republican candidate for the state’s Senate seat in 2012, his campaign confirmed to Raw Story.

Thompson filed his Statement of Candidacy with the Federal Election Commission Tuesday, the final step that establishes him as a candidate.

In an email to supporters, Thompson touted his record cutting taxes and spending.

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“Barack Obama and Harry Reid have a vastly different idea for your hard-earned money,” he wrote. “They want more and more and more. But I will fight them every step of the way.”

He cites 91 cuts he made to taxes and 1,900 vetoes on spending, resulting in $287 million of cut state spending and $16 billion saved for taxpayers.

Darrin Schmitz, a spokesman for Thompson’s campaign, touted Thompson’s experience as an elected official in a prepared statement.

“As Wisconsin’s next senator, Tommy Thompson will lead the fight for conservative, commonsense reforms to get America working again,” Schmitz said. “Thompson ushered in an era of prosperity through tax reforms and innovative solutions that empowered families and entrepreneurs. He’s committed to securing our nation’s future through fiscal accountability and job creation, and putting an end to the Obama/Reid big government agenda. Washington needs the kind of wake up call that Tommy Thompson can deliver.”

Rumors of a Thompson run have been circulating since May, and the former governor incorporated his campaign committee in mid-September.

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